News

News

DLM Difference: Authentic Coffee

We don’t just sell coffee at the DLM Coffee Bar. I mean, we do sell coffee, but there’s more at play with each pour. And this past January, myself and the three DLM Coffee Bar managers, Holli Kiser, Chris Hatfield, and Amy Bodish, traveled to the mountainous terrain of the Tarrazú region in central Costa Rica. It’s here that Hacienda La Minita is nestled. Along with some friends from Dayton’s Boston Stoker Coffee Company, including owner Henry Dean, we got to take our understanding of coffee to a new level. We not only soaked in knowledge during our five day stay, but we experienced it: we picked, we sorted, we smelled, we tasted, and we came back with a deeper understanding and appreciation for each sip, each bean, and the fine people who make it possible. —Scott Fox, VP of Bakery & Coffee Bar

“It’s one thing to sit in a room learning about coffee,” says Chris, DLM Springboro Coffee Bar manager, recalling his time in barista school. “But, it’s another seeing it in person.” The trek to where the coffee cherries grow at Hacienda La Minita is rugged terrain and the work is hard. On the first day the DLM team arrived, they strapped the picking baskets to their waists and got started alongside the pickers. They learned what to look for (red and yellow cherries) and that if you pick them too soon or too late, they won’t meet the La Minita grade. “They only pick what is ripe, so that means that they are picking four to five times from the same tree—it’s like a typewriter,” says Scott.

After the allotted picking time was up, everyone took their haul and circled around a large truck where two men stood in the bed. One would be handed a picking basket full of coffee cherries. He’d weigh the contents, shout a number, and the next man would throw money into the emptied basket before handing it back to its picker. As a Fair Trade coffee, the workers are compensated fairly, are permitted to live on the plantation, and have access to a clinic and dentist for free.

Same is true for migrant workers who come seasonally to work. After all that was harvested that day was gathered and paid out, time was ticking. It’s important for the processing of the coffee cherries to happen 24 hours from being picked before
quality diminishes. First, the haul must make its way to recibidores, or receiving stations, before continuing through the mountains to the mill. To get there, Chris, Scott, Holli, Amy, and friends rode in the back of the truck among the cherries,
“hanging on for dear life,” Scott jokes.

At the receiving station, they are weighed again—making sure what was paid out matches what is coming in. A much larger truck then picks up everything that needs to make it the mill where it is all weighed again. From there, a tedious multi-step process begins resulting in only about 20-22% of what was picked meeting the La Minita grade. The rest will be sold under a different banner.

There are layers to the coffee cherry that encase the bean within: the skin, fruit, a sticky layer called mucilage, and a thin parchment-like covering on the bean. At the mill, the beans undergo cleaning, depulping, sorting, fermentation, washing, and drying. Nothing is wasted along the way as the removed parchment feeds a fire that aids in the drying process. The travelers from DLM are witness to this all.

At the sorting stage, DLM Oakwood Coffee Bar manager Amy recalls a phrase that “every bean has a home,” even the ones that do not make the cut for La Minita. About 50-60 inspectors await, knowing just what to look for. “They are pulling out anything that is damaged, not the right color,” says Holli, DLM Washington Square Coffee Bar manager. “The biggest and most dense beans are what becomes La Minita.”

This is just one of the coffee varieties roasted locally at Boston Stoker, which we feature at the DLM Coffee Bar. The same care in finding a high quality and ethical source is taken with other varieties as well that make their way to Boston Stoker and then to DLM. “At the end of the day, La Minita is a top notch company, from their ethics and the way they do things to the quality of their coffee,” Scott says, “And Henry Dean (Boston Stoker) is incredibly well respected in the industry and knowledgeable.”

DLM Difference: FRESH Seafood Starts with Trust

DLM realized many years ago that we needed to source the very best products for our customers. At the time, most seafood sold was frozen or whatever distributors in Ohio wanted to sell you. The first step was to teach our seafood specialists all about fresh seafood. What to look for, how to handle it, how to hold and display it, and most important, develop that passion about what they sell. This passion was contagious and it did not take long to develop the trust with our customers that our seafood was truly different. When it comes to the secret behind our Seafood department, there are three legs to the stool: The freshest fish possible, the most knowledgeable fishmongers in town, and the customers who trust us to do the right thing and bring high quality seafood to Dayton, Ohio. This is the DLM Difference. —Jack Gridley, DLM VP of Meat & Seafood

TRUST THY FISHMONGER
When I walk in the door for work, my mindset instantly goes to a portion of the DLM Mission Statement that says “To make our customers happy by providing Honestly Better® food & service—every time.” Sure that involves things like smiling and knowing my customers on a first name basis, but it really involves honesty and integrity, meaning that I always tell the truth. If someone asks me “what came in today,” I tell them. Prior to coming to work at DLM 17 years ago, I was on the vendor side for a combined 27 years in this industry. I know that trust is so important, and it makes me proud to be able to deliver answers because we get the best, allowing us to serve the best. —Mike Kirkland, DLM Washington Square Fishmonger

 

WE GO STRAIGHT TO THE BEST FOR THE BEST
A huge DLM Difference is our fantastic suppliers. We go right to the source, which gets the product to our stores quicker than most, meaning that there is less time spent out of water. Plus, they are fabulous people who have become part of our DLM family. We have gone through many ups and downs of life together and they always look out for the very best our industry has to offer. These are some of the people who we talk to almost daily, and they bring fantastic seafood to our stores. There is Karl in Alaska, LaDawn from the Columbia River Valley, Frank in Boston, John up in Northern Ohio near Lake Erie, the Ready Brothers in Maine, as well as our industry friends Becky and Emily who have a vast network. My family has even spent some time with Karl’s family in Alaska touring their facility! The relationships with these small family businesses are real—we are not just an invoice number. This is a key part of our success. —Kim Swing, DLM Washington Square Seafood Manager

SCOUTING FOR THE UNIQUE
When I call my contacts to place orders, I’m always asking questions like “hey, what’s new,” “what’s popular in the industry,” and of course, “how is the fishing going?” Whether it be sourcing oyster varieties to feature that week or bringing in any number of products, these types of questions help me in my quest to pick unique items. Or, sometimes these conversations unlock preparation and serving ideas that I can tell customers about or filleting techniques. I really think that curiosity that all of us managers have is something that sets us apart. It also leads us toward new finds, and in the case of our revamped Poke bars, something truly unique.   —Jon Lemaster, DLM Springboro Seafood Manager

FRESH NEVER FROZEN
You may be asking yourself, “How is fresh (never frozen) seafood possible in midwestern Ohio?” We receive fresh shipments of seafood seven days a week from the Boston area, Washington state, and even as far as Alaska just to name a few areas, and this is thanks to our tight-knit industry relationships. We also choose air-freight to minimize that time spent out of water. In fact, long-time DLM associate Wayne Chrisman even picks up fresh fish deliveries from the Dayton airport for us. We also strive to reflect fish that is in season so we are always focusing on what is fresh now. Speaking of fresh, don’t miss our semi-annual fresh Whole Salmon Sidewalk sale this summer where we can cut the fish to your liking! —Nick Budding, DLM Oakwood Seafood Manager

FARM RAISED THE RIGHT WAY
Growing populations and less wild stock in the oceans collide with over fishing, warming of the ocean, acidification of the water, and an overall growing love of eating seafood. It’ll continue, and farm-raising seafood is part of the answer, but only if we do it to the best of our planet’s interest. We made a stand many years ago by only sourcing farm-raised seafood done the right way, with those principles practiced by our organic and “all natural” land-based farmers and ranchers taken into consideration. We look for low stocking densities, no antibiotics or growth promotants, and sustainability and responsibility of the resources used. There are so many certifications out there for farm-raised seafood, but the most important thing is to “trust thy knowledgeable DLM fishmonger.” We only deal with responsibly raised farmed seafood. —Jack Gridley, DLM VP of Meat & Seafood

The DLM Difference

Frequently, visitors from out of town tell me they miss us. Others say it’s a major reason why they love living here. I ask why. People tell me “we trust you. Others gush “the food is so good!” The best one is “the people are wonderful.”

What is the DLM Difference? We strive to make a difference, but different from what? The word “difference” begs a comparison. Are we talking adversarilly about DLM vs other markets? No, actually. It’s a noble task to feed others, and the biz is mostly populated by good people.

The DLM Difference isn’t about us or them. It is about you! It’s the difference we want to make in your life. We want to give you a special experience where you meet nice people and find good food … really good food. Shopping DLM is a source of joy, not drudgery. Simply put, we aspire to make your life better. Our company’s mission begins, “To make our customers happy.”

Even in the simplest ways, we want to make a difference, whether you’re coming in for a quick cup of coffee, getting a healthy salad, buying a loaf of bread, or filling a cart to feed your family. Maybe it’s just to pick up a treat, say a brownie.

A DEEPER DIVE

Take, for example, that cup of coffee. Maybe it was from Hacienda La Minita in Costa Rica. You savor its aroma and flavor. Why is it so good? Ask one of our Coffee Bar Managers, Amy, Holli, or Chris, as they just went to Costa Rica in January, not just visiting the plantation, but even picking the beans!

Everybody admires our salad bar thanks to Bertha at Oakwood, Loretta at Washington Square, and Connie at Springboro. They come in early and begin selecting, cleaning, chopping, and producing multi-colored edible works of art, composed of organic lettuces, nutrient-packed vegetables, exotic microgreens, and eye-popping garnishments.

We are willing to do the hard work to make a difference. Consider our DLM Artisan Bread, like our Sourdough … oh my, it’s so good! But it takes a lot of work and expertise to make it so. We have a talented team of artisans who mix from the best flours, hand-shape, and bake on the hot hearth of our juggernaut European bread oven. Great bread is also the foundation (crust) of great pizza. We studied pizza for years before creating our Naples-Style Pizza. This involved installing the specialized hearth ovens, creating the right dough, and stretching our own fresh mozzarella.

And that brownie? Yes, it has to be a Killer Brownie®, of course! Our famous triple-layer brownie is so popular that this very month we are opening a brand new facility. We feature our Killer Brownie® not just in our stores, but now distribute it throughout the country.

FOOD LOVERS UNITE

Not surprisingly, we also do business with people who think as we do and who have passion: people whose mission in life is to cultivate the sweetest pineapple, grow the healthiest chicken, or churn-out the most indulgent butter. There are many more ways you experience the DLM Difference. One other quick example is our entire Seafood department. Some people come for our seafood alone. Want to chat about fishing families in Alaska? Species of salmon? Fat content? Recipes? Cooking methods? Let’s do it!

We are a place for people who love food. And that’s the engine that drives the DLM Difference. Join us this year as we explore some of our favorite points of difference each month and highlight these DLM Differences accompanied by tastings, special events, and lots of fun in general. We love what we do. We love serving you. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to make a difference.

DLM Difference No. 1: FRESH SEAFOOD

DLM Difference No. 2: AUTHENTIC COFFEE

Check back in the months to come for more in-depth highlights select DLM Differences. 

Maria Rose

A rose is just a rose, you say? Well let me tell you about the Maria Roses we carry. Ask Felipe Villamizar, President of Maria Roses based in South America, and he’ll probably tell you about his mother Maria, the beauty of the Andes Mountains, and the graciousness of South American culture. He probably won’t tell you though that Maria Roses can be found in the best markets in Europe. He won’t brag that he can trace every rose bunch to the farm of origin and the day it was harvested. He probably won’t even mention the razor-sharp logistics of shipping his roses worldwide. But what he will talk about is the beauty of the roses, the connections they help build, and making people happy.

Maria Roses are cutting edge, coming to us from farms in Ecuador and Colombia. The Ecuadorian farms are at higher elevations and the Colombian farms at lower. With different climates, Maria is able to grow more rose varieties. Poor weather or a production problem at one farm doesn’t necessarily mean that the same problems are at another. Maria Roses cares about sustainability. As Felipe says, “It’s our land, it’s precious, and there is no more.” He is very proud of his family’s involvement, too, and will likely show you a photograph of his teenage son working at one of the farms last summer peering into a microscope in one of the laboratories.

Every few weeks, we get an email or call from Felipe asking if our customers like the Maria Roses we’re getting. Felipe has never been to our stores but he’s part of our family and culture and we are part of his.


Fresh Flower Basic Care Tips

  1. To keep your flowers fresh, place in water as soon as possible. If they’ll be out of water for longer than one hour once you leave our store, let us know so we can wrap them accordingly.
  2. Beware of extreme temperatures. Cut flowers in a hot car are doomed as are ones left exposed to the winter elements.
  3. Fill a clean vase with cold, clean water and flower food. Trim stems with sharp knife or pair of scissors. Remove any foliage that will be below the water. change water and re-cut stems every three days.
  4. Find the perfect spot. Place your vase in an area that is away from sunlight, heaters, or drafts. These will cause your flowers to wilt quickly.

Think Pink With Ruby

The biggest innovation that’s happened with chocolate in the past 80 years is here, and we couldn’t be more excited to have some fun with it. We all know and love white, milk, and dark chocolate, but now there is a fourth variation on the horizon and it’s unlike any other we’ve ever tasted. Ruby cocoa has subtle berry notes intertwined into its melt-in-your-mouth chocolate flavor.

Ruby launched across the globe in 2018 in limited quantities, only appearing in the U.S. market in more recent months. “What you taste and see comes from the cocoa bean,” says Miriam Madrigal with Barry Callebaut Chocolate, explaining that the unique flavor and color of ruby is all natural. Some fresh cocoa beans are more white inside, but a vast majority are a dark reddish pink color. Through a different way of processing the beans, ruby cocoa was created. Once you add a bit of milk and sugar to the process, the color moves into a stunning pink direction.

The DLM Pâtisserie has created two scrumptious, limited-edition desserts utilizing ruby, which will make an appearance the first few weeks of February. Ruby Cocoa Rocky Road Bars start with a no-bake cookie crust, which is topped with a mixture of toasted almonds, pistachios, housemade marshmallows, freeze-dried raspberries, and shortbread cookies folded within the ruby chocolate. We’re also featuring a Ruby Ganache Tart, composed of pistachios in a gluten-free crust, ruby chocolate ganache, fresh whipped cream, toasted pistachios, and ruby chocolate curls. In addition, our dear friend Ghyslain has made some limited-edition ruby creations to be featured at DLM, including the Ruby Slipper!

20 Years of Partnering with Ghyslain Chocolatier

There’s something to be said about a long-lasting business relationship in this industry that feels more like a well-oiled friendship. It was nearly 20 years ago that Ghyslain Maurais, chef and renowned chocolatier, crossed paths with DLM’S Scott Fox, VP of Bakery & Coffee Bar. “It’s been quite a ride,” says Ghyslain. Watching the two interact, you can see that friendship at play as they jest and riff off one another’s creativity. Scott looks back on the start of it all around this time in 1999, and he knew that he had found a gem, not just in finding a unique product to bring to Dorothy Lane Market but in linking arms with a brilliant local partner with world class experience.

A ONE-IN-A-MILLION FOOD & FRIEND FIND

Ghyslain Chocolates are stunning handpainted creations, many with a flavored ganache encased inside. Each is truly as spectacular as Ghyslain himself. Born in Québec City, Ghyslain spent several years as the head chef for the Québec ambassador at the Canadian Embassy in London and also in New York City. After using his vacation time to expand his knowledge and study chocolate making in Zürich, his creativity was truly unleashed in new ways at the embassy.

In the mid-nineties, Ghyslain was eager to make his way to the U.S. and saw a head chef position for the Ohio-based Inn at Versailles, which is heavily influenced by French culture. It was there that he met his wife Susan. The two moved to Union City, Indiana, where Susan’s family was from, and Ghyslain started making his chocolates from the kitchen of their farmhouse in 1998. Today, Ghyslain Chocolatier is a thriving business there in Indiana where he creates everything from chocolates to perfect croissants, which we also carry.

Dayton Daily News food critic Ann Heller caught wind of Ghyslain and wrote about him in 1999. Fox had to taste the chocolate and meet Ghyslain, and this was the start of our 20-year relationship.

20TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATIVE HEART BOX

That very first Valentine’s Day with Ghyslain, we featured a stunning dark chocolate heart that was hand painted red and held six beautifully crafted chocolates. You can see it photographed in the 1999 article by Ann Heller. This year, to celebrate our 20th anniversary of working with Ghyslain, we are bringing the chocolate heart back, but with some special touches for the occasion.

You’ll find the chocolate heart made from ruby chocolate, an exciting new innovation in the chocolate-making world, which is aptly timed for this occasion. The inside of the heart reveals three ruby pink chocolates filled with a ruby chocolate cream and Champagne ganache, and three platinum chocolates filled with a salted caramel ganache. The 20th Anniversary Ruby Heart Box comes enclosed in a platinum box as a nod to the milestone. It’ll be available seasonally just in time for Valentine’s Day, along with some other ruby creations by Ghyslain because every good friendship is worth celebrating.

Game Day Dips Snacking Playbook

Score a touchdown during the big game with this playbook of dips. You’ll find seasoned MVPs and new recruits.

Dill Dip
This classic dip is creamy, filled with fresh dill, and always in style.

Chipotle Lime Dip
Scoop it up with tortilla chips or try tossing it with coleslaw to dress up your fish tacos.

Spinach Dip
Our best-selling dip! Always an excellent choice for that party, family get-together, or to snack on while the game is playing.

New! Calabrian Dip
Made with bright and hot Calabrian chiles and Cheddar for balance, this dip is wicked good.

Bacon Dip
Chock-full of DLM Uncured Bacon, this dip is slightly smoky and great with potato chips.

Buffalo Chicken Dip
A game-day favorite! This dip is perfect for veggies or chips. Pro tip: serve warm for the ultimate experience.

DLM White Corn Tortilla Chips
Made with local non-GMO corn, these chips are the perfect vessels for your dipping needs.

Ready, Set, Snack!

The Golden Age of Good Milk

When I was a kid, milk played a starring role in our family food culture. We always had a gallon or two in the fridge. Not the jug, but the big, boxy container that required both child-sized hands to pour. We all had milk and cereal for breakfast in those days, and after school on special occasions my mom treated us to the wonders of warm chocolate chip cookies and milk. My dad was an accomplished milk drinker as well; he would play baseball all day with his buddies on the streets in Dayton View, and afterward Grandma would make him a bologna sandwich, washed down with a nice glass of ice-cold milk. I inherited my grandma’s cookie jar, which sits as a memento in the corner of my office right now.

So what happened to those idyllic days of dairy consumption? As we get older, it seems harder to enjoy. Maybe it makes you feel a little bloated. And then, much of popular health culture has turned against milk, decrying its difficult digestibility, its fat content, and questionable nutritional value. And yet there are cultures that, unapologetically, still thrive on dairy: from France with its innumerable cheeses, to India with its ghee and cream, to the mighty Maasai of East Africa who are prodigious consumers of pure whole milk. What gives? Could it have something to do with the type and quality of milk?

Quench your Craving for an Old-fashioned Milk — DLM Milk.

Yes, and that brings us to proudly introduce you to our new Dorothy Lane Market A2 Guernsey Milk. This is not milk from the good old days—it’s better, much better! Richer in flavor, higher in nutrition, and easier to digest than any milk we’ve ever had.
Our new milk is the brainchild of our friend Adrian Bota who grew up in Romania drinking milk from the family’s cow as a child. Adrian attended Akron University, met his wife, and settled in Northern Ohio. When their first daughter came along, he wanted to give her the gift of good milk so he set on a journey to make it happen. Through his research, he learned that most cow’s milk in the U.S., including organic, comes from factory farms and contains a protein known as A1. This protein is linked with lactose intolerance. However, certain cow’s milk, specifically with the A2 protein, is much more digestible, similar to goat’s milk, which also has A2 protein.


So what’s so special about A2? Adrian explains, “A2 milk harkens back to the way milk was before natural & human intervention caused cows to develop A1 proteins in their milk. All other mammals produce A2 milk, including humans, which means A2 milk offers a closer experience to drinking the milk that humans are supposed to have. The difference between the milk protein in A1 and A2 milk is only one amino acid—but this impacts how our bodies digest the milk. Research shows that a large number of people who think they are lactose intolerant are actually A1 intolerant and can thus drink A2 milk and not experience adverse health issues.” Although A2 milk can be found in some chain stores, most however is still from factory farms and standard breeds such as the Holstein, a breed that produces large volumes of lower fat, less-flavorful milk.

Adrian’s story converges with my own education. I remember as a kid my dad would speak with reverence about the best milk in the world coming from two heritage breeds from the British Channel Islands of Jersey and Guernsey. Their milk, according to my dad, was the ultimate! So you can imagine how proud and excited we are that our DLM milk is entirely Guernsey A2 milk! It’s produced not far from here in cooperation with Adrian by two Amish family farms, the Keims and the Yoders.

Guernsey Cows – The Key to the Golden Age of Good Milk

These fine folks raise their cows on their own grass pastures and entirely avoid the use of growth hormones, antibiotics, or GMO feed. They represent generations of farming wisdom and a love for their work. Their beautiful brown-speckled Guernsey cows are smaller and produce less volume, but a more nutritious, rich milk. In fact, compared to regular milk, ours contains 33% more vitamin D, 25% more vitamin A, 15% more calcium, 12% more protein, and a whopping 300% more Omega-3 fats! Our milk is low-heat vat pasteurized and non-homogenized—yes with the gorgeous cream on top. Its beautiful golden tinge reflects its superior nutrition and unequalled rich, creamy flavor.
If you abandoned milk long ago, maybe it’s time to give ours a try. We are proud to make this milk a prominent part of our food culture once again. Yes, right now at DLM this is milk’s golden age.

The Secret to a Good (Organic) Egg at Morning Sun

The drive out to Morning Sun Organic Farm, located near West Alexandria, Ohio, weaves through hilly, quaint towns on a beautiful autumn day. Our mobile directions fail us and we concede to the fact that we’ll be late to joining the lunch invitation extended by the Filbrun family. We get back on track after the technology fail. Soon, we are heading down the long driveway toward the Filbrun family’s farm, where we are then warmly greeted (despite being late) by both the scenic farm and our hosts, the Filbrun family. The kids run to and fro, with the youngest finding solace from the myriad of new faces (a group of us from DLM, including the Dairy managers) in the arms of her grandfather, Dale Filbrun. I quietly reach my hand into my pocket and switch my mobile to silent, not wanting the interruptions that come with it as we spend time with these kind people.

 

PURITY STARTS WITH TRANSPARENCY

DLM has had a relationship with Morning Sun Organic Farm for more than 20 years when Dale walked into DLM Oakwood with a dozen eggs and introduced himself to Larry Fourman, DLM Oakwood’s longtime Dairy manager. The yolk of a longtime friendship with DLM started that day.

Dale and his son Daren explain that the purpose of their invitation, beyond sharing our company over a meal, is transparency in how they do things. There is a purity that shines through as they delve into their belief of their product and practices. With great pride, they walk us through the inner workings of their 160-acre farm, where they have about 8,500 chickens laying approximately 7,250 eggs per day. The chickens are certified organic and cage-free, meaning that the numerous red barns that line the West Alexandria farm each have multiple openings with fans running constantly, allowing for ample ventilation, and open access to green space where the chickens can roam.

The natural feel of chickens clucking contently marries well with some modern advancements that the Filbruns have made over the years, like a conveyer belt that brings the eggs laid in nesting houses to a gathering spot. Young Daniel, age 4, doesn’t hesitate to take a break from playing to jump up and begin carefully placing the eggs in carriers. Nobody asks him to do so; he just saw the eggs and his eyes lit up, happy to help in his own way. As a parent, I can admire the sense of responsibility these children are learning. Although these tasks are carried out on a daily basis by the adults, the lifestyle is a part of them.

“We used to be washing the eggs by hand,” Daren remarks, as he carries Daniel’s sorted eggs to a machine that carefully suctions the top of each egg so that they can be cleaned. They then travel down a line to undergo a process called candling, where a bright light shines through each egg, and they’re sorted for quality and size (hence large vs. jumbo), and then finally packaged. Next step is delivery, with Morning Sun Organic Farm bringing their eggs to pockets of restaurants and retail locations, like ours.

THE SECRET TO A GOOD EGG

Daren points out how nicely the chickens are feathered, noting that they aim to not overcrowd the individual areas. In addition, each of the red barns where the chickens lay eggs has its own designated pasture, rather than a shared one.

Dale is quick to add that a good (organic) egg starts with a happy, healthy chicken, which is the result of its environment, even down to the soil. “In addition to scratching in the pasture for bugs and worms, they also get organic (and therefor non-GMO) grain raised by us,” Dale says. “We have been following the organic standards since 1992, before it was popular, because we believe in raising nutrient dense food, whether it’s for my family or our chickens.” By doing so, he says this gives Morning Sun total control over what the chickens are fed—whole grains and no animal by-products. “That’s very important,” Dale says.

After touring the farm and meeting the family and team behind Morning Sun Organic Farm, I notice one more hidden layer to what makes a good egg—the Filbrun family. Together at lunch sit four generations, from Dennis and Doris to Dale and Evelyn, Daren and Holly, and their children, joined in business as well by good friends Shane, Ellen, and Myron. Evelyn’s contagious laugh lights up any room and the kids contentedly play all the while while we enjoy conversation. As Dale says of the chickens, “birds of a feather flock together,” and so does this close-knit family.

Bundt, Bundt Baby

The beauty of the bundt cake goes beyond its sleek curves. This is a cake, after all, that has to stand alone. Although it may be finished with a chocolate coating or shower of powdered sugar, depending on the flavor, the rich, moist cake must be so good that the memory of a thick coating of icing is washed away.

It’s with this challenge in mind, that the masterminds and DLM pastry chefs Amy Brown and Lindsey Lucas, have crafted an exquisite new line of DLM Bundt Cakes. True to the bravo of bundt cakes, we bake these rich, dense, moist cakes in aluminum pans.

Not only are they a sight to behold, but each unlocks a whole new flavor profile. Approximately 6-inches and one pound each, mainstay flavors will be Hummingbird and Cinnamon Walnut.

We’ll also feature a third seasonal flavor as well (like this month’s Chocolate Peanut Butter Bundt Cake). The size makes them perfect for a hostess gift, small get-together, or an addition to your brunch or party spread.

Cinnamon Walnut Bundt Cake

Rich coffee cake layered with brown sugar and walnut streusel.

Hummingbird Bundt Cake

This delicious cake is filled with bananas, pecans, and pineapple then dusted with donut sugar!

Chocolate Peanut Butter Bundt Cake

Chocolate bundt cake with peanut butter chips encased in a peanut butter chocolate shell.