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How Sweet It Is! Our 18th Annual Peach Party

What summertime food is so good it has us grinning from ear to ear? Peaches! Not just your everyday peaches, though. We’re talking about tree-ripened Prima Peaches®—peaches so sweet and juicy, just one bite and nectar starts running down your chin.

But what really makes these peaches stand out? When harvest time arrives, the fruit is hand-harvested, with pickers passing through the orchard three times looking for fruit that’s at its peak. From there, the carefully selected fruit gets hydro-cooled (quickly cooled to stabilize them), sorted, packed into boxes, and then shipped!

At DLM, each Produce manager has a refractometer, a device used to measure the Brix level of the fruit daily. Remember, higher Brix means more sugar, which means more flavor. Whereas the Brix of the average peach lands in the 8 to 10 range, our tree-ripened peaches register at 12 and even higher! The PEACH is KING all month long, with the much-anticipated arrival of the sweetest peaches of the season filling our stores. Look for all the delicious peachy foods throughout the store that will make your taste buds dance. Come join the party! I will bring the peaches.

Why We Love Prima® Peaches

Tree-Ripened to Peachy Perfection

Tree-ripened means these peaches are left of the tree longer and picked at their peak to maximize sweetness (aka a higher Brix). this also results in a superb mouthfeel.

Brix Level

Brix is a way to measure the innate sweetness. All Peach Party Prima® Peaches have a Brix level of 12 or greater! Check our Brix sign to see what it is today!

Making the Grade

Once a Prima® Peach is carefully harvested, it is also graded. A very small percentage will make the cut to be sent to our Peach Party.

Grown in California

Coming from the San Joaquin Valley, Prima® Peaches are grown on the Gerawan family farm.

Look for “Ready Today” & “Ready Tomorrow” signs on our Peach Party display so you can plan your peach feast accordingly. We recommend that you utilize our Brix signs when picking your peaches.

35 Reasons We Love Local

It was at the Carriage Market House where Calvin D. Mayne, an entrepreneur in the wholesale fruit and vegetable business, and Vera Pacey began their courtship before they were married in 1941. The market was abuzz with excitement, as two-wheelers stacked high with produce whizzed by. On August 12, 1948, after the birth of their son Norman, their dreams came true to open a humble market. Rooted with a sense of duty to their local community and a desire to always do the right thing, Dorothy Lane Market was born. Over the years, DLM has become known as a gourmet destination, but that dedication to local continues to stand strong by featuring local foods like fruits, vegetables, meats, and more from local farmers and vendors within a morning’s drive to our stores. So come Love Local with us!

Earn Bonus Points on Love Local goodness this month when you use your Club DLM card. Get the Bonus Points list here!

1. Brentlinger’s Sweet Corn

Ray Brentlinger’s sweet corn is synonymous with summer and he’s a legend here in Dayton! In 1978, DLM began its long-standing relationship with Brentlinger’s Farm Market, located in New Carlisle. Look for this sweet corn debuting at DLM sometime around July 4. Get some scrumptious recipes using this stand-out sweet corn here!

2. Brickel Creek Organic Farm

Sue, owner of Brickel Creek Organic Farm, has always loved digging in the dirt. So much that after obtaining her master organic gardener certification, she decided to cultivate her new expertise in deeper ways. In 2007, she purchased a 69.5-acre historic farm to grow fruits and vegetables to sell at farmers’ markets and has been expanding ever since. We look forward to organic produce from Brickel Creek, from blackberries in the summer to kale, spinach, and fresh herbs all year long.

3. Guided by Mushrooms

We love the rich umami flavor that a good exotic mushroom brings to any dish. We source an exquisite collection from Dayton’s own Guided by Mushrooms, such as oyster, lion’s mane, and chestnut mushrooms.

4. Foxhole Farm

Brookville-based Foxhole Farm has a mission “to live a good and happy life by growing nourishing, flavorful food for our community.” We appreciate that as well as their microgreens!

5. Grim Organic Farm

Located in Arcanum, Michael and his son grow organic vegetables, such as certified organic corn coming to us this month.

6. Peach Mountain Organics

When you meet Leslie Garcia, she is graciously humble and clearly a hard worker (as all flower farmers are). But upon further digging, you realize that she is also deeply dedicated to growing certified organic flowers. Her majestic farm, Peach Mountain Organics in Spring Valley, is filled with vibrant colors, such as the geometrically detailed and dazzling dahlias that she grows with great care. “We’ve been certified organic since 1992 and we are certified because we believe in organic so much that we want to be counted,” she says. “Flowers are beautiful and fleeting, kind of like life… It’s what I’ve done almost my entire adult life.”

7. Bowman & Landes

There’s something to be said about our DLM Free-Range Turkey, and how two local friends, DLM and Bowman & Landes Turkeys, Inc., have come together for many years. Our flock is raised locally for us in New Carlisle, Ohio. Not only is it free-range, antibiotic free, and fed a 100% vegetarian diet, but it’s also Non-GMO Project Verified.

8. 80 Acres Farms

The new age of farming is happening now, just a short trek south in Cincinnati at 80 Acres Farms. Not only do they grow year-round thanks to indoor farming techniques, but they use zero pesticides, food miles are kept to a minimum, and they use 100% renewable energy. Thanks to vertical farming techniques, they are able to grow the equivalence of a much larger traditional farm. We are grateful to partner with the passionate and brilliant minds at 80 Acres for our DLM Salad Blends, which feature curated selections of lettuces, such as frisée and red romaine, and microgreens.

9. Hartzler Family Dairy

Sure you love Hartzler’s seasonal egg nog (who doesn’t), but check our Dairy case year-round for their milk, and whimsical single-serve flavored milks.

10. Tracey Rae Farmer Florist

Always on-trend, Tracey Rae’s stunning local bouquets are truly something to behold. She curates must-have combinations featuring the best of the season, from ranunculus and anemones to peonies and snapdragons. Located in Midland, Ohio, we clamor to see what she’s brought us when she pulls up with our delivery.

11. Cedar Ridge Trails Lavender

There’s something special about this locally grown cut lavender. The connection between Cedar Ridge Trails and DLM goes all the way back to DLM founder Calvin D. Mayne, who was raised in the house on the farm. Ship the Cedar Ridge Lavender Gift Set featuring some of our favorite products from Cedar Ridge Trails via shop.dorothylane.com!

12. Local Grass-Fed Beef

Our DLM Local Grass-Fed Beef Program is possible thanks to Love Local farming families raising grass-fed cattle in the Miami Valley. All of these families work with us to ensure that they abide by our program’s best practices, meaning they are fed a 100% grass-fed diet and are lifetime free of antibiotic and added hormones.

As the cows graze on the lush spring grass, the flavor profile of the beef changes dramatically causing the Omega-3s and CLAs to surge. Not to mention, it fuels the local economy for an added benefit. We started this program in 2010 as a way to provide the health benefits of grass-fed beef locally by linking arms with area farming families. At Hanna Family Farms in Cedarville, the farm sits on a wooded setting that opens up to 101 acres of pasture. Meanwhile, at Clark Family Farm, there are 90 acres of pasture land where the Scottish Highland, Wagyu, and Aberdeen Angus Cattle roam.

13. Morning Sun Organic Farm Eggs

After visiting Morning Sun Organic Farm, located near West Alexandria, Ohio, we noticed one more hidden layer to what makes a good egg—the Filbrun family! We’ve carried their certified organic, cage-free eggs for 20+ years, working with multiple generations of the Filbrun family. Dale Filbrun says that a good egg starts with a happy, healthy chicken, which is a result of its environment. The chickens feed both on the bounty of the pasture and on organic (and therefore non-GMO) grain that the family grows, containing no animal by-products.

14. Eagle Ridge Apiaries

DLM 100% Pure Honey glistens, thanks to Al Tuttle of Eagle Ridge Apiaries, a Miami Valley beekeeper who produces our unprocessed raw honey. He tends to about 70 hives with each having 50,000-60,000 bees.

15. Wesler Orchards

Apple splendor awaits at Wesler Orchards in New Paris, Ohio, and each batch is freshly pressed into DLM Apple Cider, a fall time treat here. The ingredients? 100% pure apples, reflecting the variety of apples that are picked at their peak.

16. VanMeter Family

What we love most about the VanMeter Family Farm (besides their sweet farm-fresh strawberries and watermelon) is that they grow with heart. Trish and Danny VanMeter see farming as a way to share their corner of the world with others.

17. Ohio Gifts

There’s a fervent appreciation for iconic Ohio goods, like those that we ship in gift sets via shop.dorothylane.com. The Ohio Nostalgia Box, right, features mainstays, while the Ohio Artisan Box has the most delicious gourmet twist.

18. Orion Organics

When you meet Jon Paul of Orion Organics in Yellow Springs, you’ll find that his enthusiasm and knowledge for organic, healthy produce is contagious. From squash to sweltering summertime red tomatoes and peppers, we look forward to a variety of hometown produce streaming in all summer long.

19. Look for Local in Our Recipes

It’s hard for any chef to resist quality local produce at its peak of the season, which is why you’ll notice a number of our Made Right Here creations from our Kitchens, Sandwich Station, and Naples-Style Pizza Station featuring local produce when available.

20. Harvey Eicher Family

Just a morning’s drive away in Adams County, Indiana, Harvey Eicher Jr. and his Amish friends bring us fresh vegetables regularly, including the plumpest, juiciest tomatoes around. They grow in hoop houses to extend the growing season, which means more local tomatoes!

21. That Guy’s Farm

That Guy” is Guy Ashmore and it so happens that his daughter, Nellie, runs “That Girl’s Flowers,” No. 23. Farming alongside one another, That Guy’s Family Farm brings us certified organic sweet potatoes, kale, arugula, beets, and more from their Clarksville-based farm.

22. Local Coffee

For many years, we’ve had a wonderful relationship with Dayton’s beloved Boston Stoker Coffee, featuring high-quality beans sourced directly from farmers and roasted in small batches. Enjoy whether you’re picking up a bag or stopping by our DLM Coffee Bar! Find more local coffee by heading down our coffee aisle, where you’ll find more local gems: Erie Island Company, Crimson Cup Coffee, Silver Bridge Coffee Company, Reza’s Roast, Twisted River Roaster, Rooted Grounds Coffee Co., Zingerman’s Coffee Company, and Yield Coffee Roaster.

23. That Girl’s Flowers

Nellie Ashmore is “That Girl” and she is making a name for herself in the organic flower farming industry. Growing up, she’d help on the family farm and accompany her parents to farmers’ markets. Several years ago, after completing college, she started her own business, bringing to us beauties like larkspur, sunflowers, and celosia.

24. Old Soul’s Farm

A pristine, climate-controlled greenhouse allows the kind souls at Old Soul’s Farm to grow all year using hydroponic techniques. We are grateful for ample supply of our DLM Basil & Living Basil, DLM Arugula, and more.

25. More Local Flowers!

We’ve worked hard to extend our local connections to include more flower farmers over the years. In addition to those mentioned, we also carry a variety of local splendor from more area growers, like Hungry Toad Farm and The Flower Field!

26. Local Lamb

Veterinarian Paul Hunter started Loramie Lamb in the 1980s fully aware he’d be an anomaly, as lamb is not as mainstream as other meat items. That doesn’t stop Paul though from continuing to raise this lesser-known red meat that’s rich in protein.

27. Maverick Chocolate

With a bean-to-bar approach, Cincinnati-based Maverick has received accolades from the International Chocolate Awards. Former mechanical engineer Paul Picton has delved into the biz together with his son, Ben.

28. DLM Private Label

You’ve surely noticed our DLM products while you shop, which wear our name because we simply love both how they taste and how they are made. Many of these DLM private label items are produced locally for us, like our jarred fruits, pickles, sauces, 1948 Classic Dark Roast Coffee, and more. For some, the connection goes quite deep, such as our DLM Uncured Grass-Fed Beef Hot Dogs, utilizing beef from our local DLM Grass-Fed Beef Program. Then, there’s our DLM Bone Broths, nutrient-rich and good for the soul, the beef flavor is made from the bones of the DLM Grass-Fed Beef cattle; the same with the DLM Turkey Bone Broth—using turkey bones from Bowman & Landes.

29. Culinary Center Local Instructors

Local chefs, cookbook authors, and personalities keep guests happily fed and entertained at the DLM Culinary Center! Take for instance Bryn Mooth, Findlay Market Cookbook author, and her upcoming class on Tuesday, July 20. Register for this class here!

30. Local Beer

Within a stone’s throw in any direction, Dayton and Cincinnati are lucky to be brimming with local breweries that are crafting some amazing beers. Cool down at your cookout with some local brew, such as: Warped Wing Brewing Co., The Dayton Beer Company, Yellow Springs Brewery, Rhinegeist Brewery, and MadTree Brewing to name a few. Come visit us to see even more local brews!

31. DLM Gelato & Sorbetto

We know you love Columbus-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams and Cincinnati’s Graeter’s (and so do we!). But enjoy carefree, quintessential Italian moments with our DLM Gelato and Sorbetto in hand, made for us locally using traditional Italian recipes and methods.

32. Turkey Red Wheat Bread

Turkey red wheat is a hard winter wheat that’s not predominately grown in Ohio, but thanks to three local farmers—Edward Hill, Dale Friesen, and Danny Jones—we have a local crop that’s milled farmside. From the harvest, we bake Turkey Red Wheat Bread. Dale’s grandparents were among the German Mennonites who brought with them the seeds of turkey red wheat when they fled Russia to the U.S. years ago. He’s overcome with emotion to see the crop of his ancestors growing on Ohio soil.

33. DLM A2 Milk

The golden age of good milk is now. Our DLM A2 Guernsey Milk is rich in flavor, high in nutrition, and easy on digestion. It’s the brainchild of local collaborator Adrian Bota, who sought to create a cow’s milk featuring the A2 milk protein found in a breed of cows known as Guernsey.

34. Ghyslain Chocolatier

Truly an art, our dear friend and chocolatier Ghyslain Maurais in Union City, Indiana, sends us his hand-painted chocolates and carefully crafted Parisian macarons.

35. More Local Splendor

Truth is, when you do a list like this, you can’t include everything, or else we’d be publishing a novel. All our local vendors make DLM special. Come Love Local, and enjoy earning Bonus Points on local products this July!

Get the Complete Bonus Points List Here

Food Explorer Pleasures of Le Picnic

Sharing good food in the great outdoors—one of life’s most idyllic moments. It’s a beautiful concept shared by people everywhere, from a Hawaiian luau at sunset to an afternoon New England garden party. Now is the time to rediscover this most beautiful tradition!

FRENCH ORIGINS

Particularly in France, picnicking is the fabric of summer pastimes. I once wrongly assumed they borrowed the word from us, you know, as they did in “Le week-end.” Rather, it seems we adopted our English word “picnic” from the French “piquenique,” referenced as “a picking or nibbling of bits.” The etymology is fun, but the eating is even better! A French picnic is elegant, tasty, and beautifully simple.

The French have always loved to eat outside. Over a century ago, Renoir captured the joy and camaraderie of it all in his famous painting Dance at the Moulin de la Galette. Do a search for images of “Paris picnic” and you’ll see that outdoor gastronomy remains alive and well in French culture. If you do find yourself in Paris and are in the mood for creating your own fête en plein air, there are numerous venues to choose from. To start, head to the 7th district street market on La Rue Cler for baguettes, cheese, charcuterie, wine, and other provisions. A fifteen-minute walk in one direction is the large grassy field at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, the Champs de Mars. Or, even closer in the opposite direction is another sprawling lawn framing Napoleon’s tomb at Les Invalides.

LOCAL ADVENTURES

Pending a trip to Paris … why not kick off a great summer with a picnic at one of our area’s appealing venues? We did just that at John Bryan State Park recently on a particularly pristine Sunday. We took a little hike to work up the appetite, and rewarded ourselves with crusty bread, cheese, fresh fruit, and charcuterie.

Indeed, French food in particular is so well suited for picnics, including ones here in southwest Ohio. The basic elements are bread, cheese, charcuterie, fruits, crudités, and summer beverages

PLAN YOUR FEAST

Bread is obvious. We love our DLM Artisan French Baguettes for picnics, as well as its little sibling, the thinner, salted Ficelle. For heartier sandwiches, grab a loaf of Miche, which is our take on France’s hearty, crusty sourdough bread.

Fromage? Oui! Start with a soft-ripened cheese, such as Fromager d’Affinois or the iconic Brie de Meaux, add a nutty Comté Gruyère from the French Alps, and finish your cheese plate with the famous funky blue, Le Papillon Roquefort. Charcuterie includes sliced cured meats from Madrange ham and Three Little Pigs Saucisson Sec to pâté of all sorts … truffle mousse, duck rillettes, and chicken liver.

Stone fruits and strawberries are now in season, and they are perfect for a picnic. It’s always nice to cut them into quarters and serve alongside the cheeses. As for crudités (veggies) such as carrots, celery, broccoli, asparagus, and cucumbers, they are good raw, but even better blanched. Immerse for just a few minutes in salted boiling water, and then transfer to ice water for a minute to stop the cooking. Rinse and dry before packing in your picnic basket, and bring some of our Deli’s homemade dips.

For beverages, we have everything from our refreshing DLM Natural Spring Water to Lorina’s French lemonade (mix lemonade equally with a lager to make a French summer favorite called panaché) to abundant choices of wines for summer. Voilà … let’s go on a pique-nique!

Welcome Summer With French Wines

Early summer is a perfect time for dining al fresco in the Miami Valley, so let’s take a cue from the French and practice picnicking in style with some refreshing French wines! From every corner of this country comes a gastronomical wonder that just simply delights the senses and makes time in the fresh outdoors with good company that much better. Whether you’re slathering some Isigny Ste-Mère Butter on a DLM Artisan French Baguette or enjoying a bit of pâté with a cornichon, you must have a beverage to amplify the senses on the palate.

Speaking of the perfect beverage, National Rosé Day just happens to be June 12! For the ultimate safe poolside or picnic basket friendly pick, there is French Pool Toy, a wonderfully dry and flavorful rosé that’s in a recycled plastic bottle … no glass to break! Keep reading for some other wonderful food friendly yet simply pleasing wines.

LE GRAND BOUQUETEAU CHINON ROSÉ
A pink wine from the Loire Valley that is simply stunning! ($17)

CHÂTEAU DE CAMPUGET COSTIÈRES-DU-NÎMES
From the southwest region of France, this dry wine was one of our favorites on a visit, featuring an abundance of fresh berry fruit and a floral bouquet! ($13, save $2)

CLARENDELLE BORDEAUX ROSÉ
A rare rosé from the prestigious region of Bordeaux, this wine is actually sourced from its owner, the famous Château Haut-Brion! ($15, save $5)

DOMAINE DE PAJOT LES 4 CÉPAGES
This white from the South of France is a blend of Sauvignon Blanc, Colombard, Ugni Blanc, and Gros Manseng. Perfectly balanced, it’s crisp, clean, dry, and extremely friendly! ($11)

CLOS NORMAND BRUT CIDER
A delightful sparkling cider that’s dry, flavorful, and perfect with pâté and charcuterie. ($7)

LA MAXIMUS COTEAUX BOURGUIGNONS
From the southern edges of Burgundy, this red wine is a super-pleasing blend of Pinot Noir and Gamay. It’s very food friendly and does not have the heavy alcohol-laden tones of a bigger wine. ($10, save $5)

HOW TO MAKE PANACHÉ
Looking for a twist on your French lemonade? Mix half of Lorina Sparkling French Lemonade with Kronenbourg 1664 French Lager. Serve over ice for a refreshing summer drink!

The French Connection

You don’t have to look far once you step in our doors to get a taste of French cuisine. You see, like an artist paints when they are inspired, we never forget a good meal or glass of wine when we travel. That inspiration comes to life within Dorothy Lane Market in so many ways.

Take for instance our Miche Bread. In the fascinating world of French bread, if the baguette is a big city slicker, then the Miche is its soulful country cousin. The word derives from an old French word for ‘loaf’, and it’s the type of country sourdough that was once baked in large, stone communal ovens in France, but is now made famous by Parisian bakers. Our beloved Miche was inspired by our travels to the bakery-lined streets of Paris. We simply knew we must make our own so that you could enjoy it, too.

Properly crafted Miche such as ours is one of the world’s great sourdough breads, with a dark, chewy crust and complex, moist interior. The magic happens when the living dough marries the sweetness of wheat and backbone of rye. The sourdough taste is subtle, but enough to leave you craving more! It’s great products like our Miche that bring a taste of the world to your plate here at DLM.

More French cuisine favorites to explore at DLM!

SHOP FRENCH ITEMS THAT SHIP!

Pan Bagnat: A Picnic-Perfect Sandwich

Pan Bagnat is the iconic French make-ahead sandwich that’s perfect for outdoor eating. Think Salade Niçoise, but in sandwich form. We love making it on our DLM French Boule, but you also can build this luscious Provençal French-style sandwich on our DLM Artisan French Baguette or Ciabatta. From there, a good quality tuna packed in oil partners up with the flavors within, melding with the sliced egg, ripe tomato, olive tapenade, and slivered onion. The magic happens though when it’s made ahead of time, even overnight. Wrap it tightly before refrigerating so that all of the flavors can beautifully mingle to season the sandwich.

Get the Recipe!

PICNIC-PERFECT SIDE RECIPES

Complete your picnic with the perfect sides! Try our recipes for a French-Style Potato and Green Bean Salad and Celery Root Salad.

Claws Out for Lobstermania 2021

As we dive into exploring the great foods of New England, it all culminates to the king of the sea—Maine lobster! This anticipated catch will make its traditional splash at DLM for Lobstermania, May 29, as it does every year the Saturday before Memorial Day. Thousands of fresh lobsters make their way to us from the brisk waters of Maine from our lobstering friends at Ready Seafood for this annual tradition. Choose live and embark on a cooking adventure at home! Or, if you’d rather skip that part, well, that’s ok, as we’ll also have pre-cooked whole lobster available, too.

Get lobster cooking/reheating instructions here!

Remember that Lobstermania starts at 9 a.m. and once they’re gone, they’re gone! Here is how it works:

Step 1: Pre-pay for your lobster at any register in stores on Saturday, May 29, starting at 9 a.m. Live lobsters are $16 each and cooked lobsters are $19 each.
Step 2: After you pay inside, your cashier will hand you a lobster card to correlate with whether you are getting “live” or “cooked” whole lobster. Head outside to the Lobstermania outdoor station to get your Maine lobster.
Step 3: Present your Lobster Card at the Lobstermania station. We will fulfill your order!

 

An Annual Tradition

Each year for decades, folks have made a tradition out of Lobstermania, a much welcomed springtime feast!

Although we’ve always known that Lobstermania was special, these past few years have reminded us just how important and fun food traditions like this are in our lives. We also have been reminded how special friendships are, too, like ours with the folks at Ready Seafood in Maine. Not only are they all-around great people, but they catch with sustainability in mind to ensure lobster for many years to come. Although we will miss our lobstering friends this year at Lobstermania, we are grateful to continue featuring this bounty from the brisk waters of Maine!


HOW TO COOK LOBSTER

STEAM

  • In a large pot, bring 2 inches of salted water to a rolling boil over high heat.
  • Drop in the live lobsters. Leaving rubber bands on is optional, but safer.
  • Quickly cover and return to a boil.
  • When the pot starts steaming, cook for approximately 12 to 15 more minutes.

BOIL

  • Get a big pot and fill with fresh water about 2/3 full.
  • Add 1 to 2 Tbsp of salt per gallon of water. Bring to a boil and add lobsters.
  • Start the timer when the water comes back to a boil. You can figure 6-7 minutes for a 1.25-lb lobster, 7-9 minutes for 1.5-lb lobster, and 10-12 minutes for a 2-lb lobster.

*Remember, sometimes the lobster may be undercooked even if the shell is entirely red. Double check that the meat is a creamy white color with no translucent areas. Give a good tug on one of the antennae. If it pops off, the lobster is done. You can also insert an instant read thermometer into the underside of the tail. It should read 135-140°F.

HOW TO REHEAT LOBSTER

  • Wrap lobsters individually in foil. Place in a 350°F oven on a cooking sheet, belly up, and heat until warm. Or, place the foil-wrapped
    lobsters on the grill to warm.

HOW TO EXTRACT MEAT

Be sure to save the shells for stock!

FROM THE TAIL

  • Twist it off the body of the lobster and bend the tail fins upward until they snap. With your finger or a chopstick, push the tail meat out.
  • Similar to de-veining shrimp, make a shallow cut down the center top to expose the intestinal tract and remove it.

FROM THE KNUCKLE AND CLAWS

  • Twist off or cut with shear the knuckles and claws from the body in one piece. Separate the knuckles from the claws. Crack open the knuckles with the back of a chef’s knife or shears and remove meat.
  • Bend the small part of the claw up and down until it snaps. Gently pull away this small shell, leaving the meat inside still attached to the big part of the claw.
  • With shears or the back of a chef’s knife, crack open the claw and remove the meat in one piece. Make sure to remove the wide fin of cartilage from inside the claw meat.

Get Lobster-centric recipes here!

The Great Clam Chowder Debate

New Englanders take serious pride in their New England clam chowder, which you can easily find being slurped up at lobster shacks and roadside diners as well as top-rated restaurants. The famed cream-based soup has been around for a long time, being served in Boston in the early 1800s at the Union Oyster House (one of our country’s oldest continuously operating restaurants).

But the rivalry started when a Manhattan version was created in the 1930s that was tomato based. It caused such an uproar that in 1939, a bill was introduced in Maine to ban the use of tomatoes in clam chowder. It did not pass and has been an ongoing debate ever since.

clam chowder

The difference is visible—there’s no mistaking the two. Both are delicious and have the briny, sweet flavor of clams. The New England version tends to be richer and thicker whereas the Manhattan chowder is more vegetal with a lighter, more brothy base. I love that both styles can support my habit of using plenty of hot sauce and oyster crackers!

This month, our Seafood department will be making both New England and Manhattan Chowders (available in the hot soup well located by the Seafood department and in the soup grab ‘n go area). Come in and try our take on both styles of clam chowder. Then, we want to hear what you think! Take our Great Chowda Debate poll on our Facebook page.

Food Explorer New England Eats

EXPLORE NEW ENGLAND EATS

New Englanders have a fierce loyalty for their home towns and their patriotic history. Between the cordial quirkiness of the small towns, the buzz of big city Boston, old fishing ports, stunning architecture, plus the great outdoors—road tripping through New England is a must, especially as the beginning notes of summer are starting to play in May. We get it—miles and miles of gorgeous coastlines, picturesque lighthouses, quaint towns, and tons of outdoor activities. But let’s talk about the food—think succulent seafood from the land of lobster, as well as plump, briny oysters and clams for days. So many lobster and clam shacks, so little time! You’ll also find a plethora of local farmers’ markets (and Maine blueberries), renowned cheesemakers, breweries, and bakeries with whoopie pies piled high. What’s not to like? As we gear up for Lobstermania, May 29, we’ll be celebrating New England foods and recipes all month! So come get a taste of how delicious summer can be with these New England eats.

>Get our New England Eats checklist here!

Vermont Fromage Bliss

The U.S. is teeming with amazing cheesemakers from coast-to-coast who have been getting worldwide attention, as they’re making cheese that rivals the great fromage traditions of the “old world.” Many of us think of American cheese coming from the stalwarts on the coasts, such as Cypress Grove, Tillamook, and Laura Chenel to name a few. However, as we started to turn our taste buds toward the New England area, all things fromage seemed to bring us to Vermont!

Keep scrolling for Vermont Cheesemakers and picks to have on your radar! 

MODERN MAKERS MEET TRADITIONAL MAINSTAYS

Vermont is a state rich in agriculture, specifically dairy farming with a number of seasoned producers celebrating 100+ years of tradition. Then, there are newbies like the Kehler brothers of Jasper Hill Farm. Andy and Mateo Kehler bought the farm in the late 1990s with the goal of creating opportunities for Vermont’s working landscape with the concept of value-added agriculture … making milk into something more valuable before it leaves the farmer. They even take leftover whey from the cheese-making process and feed it to the Heritage breed pigs of Jasper Hill Farm Charcuterie. Having cheese aging caves below their barns helped them early on when their neighbors, Cabot Creamery, called needing aging space in these caves. You see, the Kehlers were making a name for themselves with clothbound Cheddars and European-style cheese that need space dedicated to cultivating natural rinds. In contrast, Cabot Creamery, a fantastic coop founded in 1919, had warehouses focused on keeping surface mold away from cheese!

FROMAGE TO LOOK FOR: Jasper Hill Farm Harbison (a soft-ripened cheese with a rustic, bloomy rind and wrapped in spruce cambium), Jasper Hill Farm Bayley Hazen Blue (made from the farm’s high quality whole raw milk, its dense texture has a toasted nut sweetness), Jasper Hill Farm Cabot Clothbound (produced in partnership with Cabot Creamery, these wheels are coated in lard and a layer of cloth to ripen and are constantly brushed, turned, and monitored), Cabot Smoky Bacon Cheddar is filled with crispy bacon bits and hickory smoke making it a super nibbler cheese.

WORLD-CLASS WONDERS

As you continue this cheese trek through this beautiful state, you’ll come to Vermont Creamery, started in 1984 by Allison Hooper and Bob Reese with the goal of making world-class products from goat’s milk. They exceeded their wildest expectations, and in addition to the many medals for their cheese, Allison is a James Beard Foundation winner. The Creamery, upon the founder’s retirement, continues under the ownership of the farmer owned cooperative, Land O’Lakes. Grafton Village Cheese Co. founded in the historic town of Grafton, Vermont, in 1892 is also world class! It started like many cooperatives of the time—by dairy farmers who needed to turn surplus milk into cheese in the days before refrigeration.

FROMAGE TO LOOK FOR: Grafton Village Cheese 1 Year Aged Cheddar (a classic New England Cheddar profile, comforting, lightly tangy, and rich), Vermont Creamery Bijou Goat Cheese Crottin (a stunning hand-shaped button cheese that’s perfect with Rosé), Vermont Creamery Coupole Aged Goat Cheese (aged goat’s milk cheese with a wrinkly, edible rind and a bright, fresh cheese taste).

Ship the New England Cheese Flight via shop.dorothylane.com to get a sampling of a variety of Vermont cheeses.