News

News

Sausages with a Bang!

If you haven’t tried our bangers we make every day fresh in our Meat department, this weekend is a good time to start. We make both English-style and Irish-style (difference being the Irish has the addition of ginger) with just the right amount of fat to make the sausage pop and “bang” while browning them up in a skillet.

At my house, I like to roll them around in a sauté pan with a little oil and get the casing nice and snappy. We also have some really good bangers from a company called Jolly Posh. These sausages are larger in diameter and great for a quick Irish Banger Dinner or stuffed inside one of our Bakery buns with some whole grain mustard.

Started by Nicholas Spencer, Jolly Posh was inspired by traditional Irish foods and his hunger for the classic flavors of home (Ireland). Their all-natural bangers are free of hormones as well as nitrites, nitrates, and MSG. In our stores, look for their Traditional Pork Bangers and Pork & Herb Bangers.

Or try some of their white pudding, which is seasoned pork, oatmeal, and breadcrumb mixture that is awesome for an “over the pond” breakfast experience. Just slice it up, fry it till golden brown, and serve it alongside some of our local eggs. It’s magically delicious!

Seafood Menus

As you’re looking for Friday meal ideas, be sure to stop by our Sandwich Station for a Chesapeake Crab Cake Sandwich. Or, visit Jack’s Grill and choose a piece of fish and have it grilled for lunch or dinner. Jack’s Grill also has a variety of menu items showcasing some of the most scrumptious seafood sandwiches, such as Cod,  Tilapia, and our ever-popular Lobster Roll.

Sandwich Station

Jack’s Grill

 

7 Ideas for a Fish Dish Meal

Remember, your fishmonger is your friend and here at DLM. They are knowledgeable and passionate about sourcing the best and the freshest! But what does that word “fresh” really mean? It’s often overused because everyone says their seafood is “fresh” to the point that the word has almost lost its meaning. Our definition of the word is one we stand behind and is one of the building blocks that has elevated our Seafood department over the years. It comes down to “time spent out of water,” says Jack Gridley, DLM VP of Meat & Seafood, and there are several ways that we keep that time to a minimum. We do so by buying it direct from fishing co-ops that practice sustainable techniques. We also choose air freight instead of having it travel by truck, resulting in drastically less time out of water.

The constant stream of new fish in our seafood case is a true reflection of what’s in season. So as the Lenten season begins, check with us often as we’ll be featuring a vast selection of seasonal catches as they are available as well as a variety of shellfish. Here are 7 recipes so you can cook up a fish dish for your table, whether it’s for Fish Friday or any day.

 

Cookies to END ALZ Contest

A huge “Thank you” to our 20 participants in the “Cookies to END ALZ” Cookie Contest. They were beautiful, delicious, and each came with a touching story of why they were entering. But when the dust settled (or powdered sugar) the Black Raspberry Cheesecake French Macarons came out on top as the winner. Followed closely by the Dulce de Leche Mexican Cinnamon Sugar and the Double Chocolate Marshmallow.

The winning recipe comes to us from Maggie Perry of Fairborn. View the winning recipe here.

We also would like to extend a sincere “Thank You” to all of you who purchased the limited-edition Laura’s Cookie Design. $1 from each cookie is being donated to the Alzheimer’s Association Miami Valley Chapter. Thanks to your generous support we are sending a check for $1,312 to help END ALZ.

Irish Cheddars to Treasure

It seems that in March, everyone is a touch Irish and enjoys a pint or two of great Irish beer, particularly with that favorite American pastime—college hoops! However, Ireland is known for a plethora of wonderful food traditions and amongst our favorites are the cheeses!

Oscar Wilde Irish Cheddar is aged for two years and made with the milk of cows that are pasture fed during the months of milk production in County Cork.

Dubliner is like a Cheddar in texture but with the sweet, nutty taste of a Swiss and piquant flavor of an aged Italian-style cheese. It’s perfect with an Irish stout and charcuterie.

Cahill’s Irish Whiskey Cheddar, originally made for festive occasions, is now a year-round treasure. It’s made using Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey that lends a savory, rich tone. You’ll also love Cahill’s Irish Porter Cheese, which is odd-looking, but is perfect as the centerpiece on a cheese board.

Fish Friday Find

When it comes to the farm-raised salmon we carry, we seek the very best. So many providers raise their salmon in densely packed waters with antibiotics so that they grow as fast as possible. We take it upon ourselves to source farm-raised salmon that’s antibiotic free, fed an organic diet, and given plenty of room. The farms also practice rotation to allow sites to redevelop naturally. “They’re raised the right way,” says Jack Gridley, VP of Meat & Seafood.

The Shetland Farm Organic Salmon we carry is raised in floating ocean pens about 100 miles off the coast of Scotland. The fast-moving currents of the cool water are perfect for raising salmon, which are certified organic by the UK.

Farm-Raised King Salmon from Creative Salmon Co. is certified organic by Canada. “The Farm Raised King Salmon is raised in Tofino Bay, British Columbia … the cold, clean, fast-moving water provides the fish with the same environment as its wild counterparts with plenty of room to swim and develop muscle,” says Jon Lemaster, DLM Springboro Seafood manager. “Both of these farm-raised salmon are from two of the best farms in the world and we’re very proud to have them in our cases.”

Wusthof Knives

Getting to the Point

Wusthof KnivesAfter 20 years of teaching the knife skills class, I am still amazed what a lot of folks don’t know about knives. It may sound strange, but learning how to hold and use a knife correctly will help you work faster and safer. Sometimes all it takes is a little forethought before you just randomly start breaking down your veggies.

The benefit of good knife skills comes with uniformity. I can’t stress this point enough! Every time you lift your knife to cut or chop, think to yourself: Is this the same thickness? Is this the same size as the last piece? Plain and simply put, pieces of food that are the same size and shape cook at the same rate. I remember my mom fishing around a big pot of boiling potatoes looking for the biggest to see if potatoes were done yet! With uniformity, you don’t have to ‘go fishing’.

Another bonus to good knife skills and uniformity is presentation. We all know that we eat first with our eyes. There is a simple elegance to perfectly cut and sized vegetables that a ”rough  chop” will never be able to give. If you’re looking to get on point, here are a couple of my favorite knives that we always carry in the Culinary Center:

I love the Chef’s knife. It can handle a lot of the everyday tasks in your kitchen. Its stable and curved blade helps promote a rocking motion that enables you to have better control and a finer dice. Available in 3 sizes (6 inch,  8 inch, and 10 inch) I like to call the 8-inch knife the workhorse of the kitchen. The 6 inch is a good one for beginners or those who are a little shy about knives. The 10 inch can cover more ground when prepping for larger quantities.

A Bread knife can do things that the chef’s knife just can’t.  Think things that squish. You use a sawing motion when using this knife, so it’s perfect for bread, tomatoes, croissants, etc. The serrated blade is not meant for chopping.

The Paring knife is handy to have around. Whether you are paring, peeling, or slicing, the small size of the blade can tackle mincing garlic to peeling an apple. Most are now available with either a serrated blade or a straight one.

When it comes to Japanese knives, two of my favorites are the Santoku and the Nakiri. The hollow edge of a Santoku creates air pockets which help prevent thin cuts or soft slice foods from clinging to the blade. The straighter, blunt, squarish shape of the Nakiri facilitates a straight up and down motion for chopping and most veggie prep.

Feel free to come in and ask us any questions you may have. We love talking knives and are happy to set you up with a cutting board so you can try out whatever type of knife you are interested in.  Or sign up for our popular knife skills class.  I look forward to seeing you soon!

The Art of the Winter Roast

Simply speaking , pot roasting or braising is cooking a tougher cut of meat gently and slowly in liquid until it becomes tender. This can result in a flavorful sauce that’s just waiting to be served with a starch or sopped up with DLM Artisan Bread.

The bonuses are plenty as not only does it make your house smell amazing but it feeds a crowd of people economically. And yes, it does tend to taste better after a day or two, so make enough for leftovers.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT CUT OF MEAT

Good news—tougher cuts tend to be cheaper and they make the best braises. That combo of low and moist heat turns well-worked muscles, sinews, and connective tissue into rich, gelatinous, fall-off-the-bone deliciousness. Try: Chuck roasts, short ribs, pork shoulder, veal breast, lamb shanks, and chicken thighs. Bone–in meat imparts even more flavor.

BROWN & SEAR LIKE THE BEST

This step creates the foundation flavors for the entire braise, resulting in gorgeous, deep golden-brown coloring. Browning takes time and space, so don’t crowd your pan as it may take multiple rounds! Heat a heavy-bottomed pan or Dutch oven with a little fat to start. Then, complete the following steps.

STEP 1: Remove browned meat from pan and start the next round of browning mirepoix, additional veggies, aromatics, etc. 

STEP 2: Deglaze pan using liquid. This helps those browned bits become liquid, reinforcing the dish’s foundation flavors. Use enough liquid to partially submerge the meat. More liquid yields a stew-like consistency while less results in a more concentrated, richer sauce.

STEP 3: Cover dish and either place in a low-heat oven (325°F or less) or low simmer on the stove. Note that the oven tends to be more consistent. How long? It depends on what you’re braising and the size of the cut. That’s the thing about braises—it’s done when it’s fork tender.

STEP 4: Season sauce to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a splash of acid, such as lemon juice or a glug of wine to brighten things up. Want the sauce thicker? Remove the meat and veggies and bring liquid to a strong simmer. Reduce until desired consistency and season.

POT ROAST 3-WAYS

GUINNESS BEEF STEW

Meat: Chuck roast cut into 2-inch pieces.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix, leeks, potatoes.
Deglazer: Guinness Stout.

BEEF IN BAROLO

Meat: Chuck roast.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix, pancetta, fennel, tomato.
Deglazer: A hearty dry red wine (try Barolo).

AMERICAN POT ROAST

Meat: Chuck roast.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix and potatoes.
Deglazer: Beef stock.

Warm Your Soul with Soup

It’s 11:24 a.m. on a Wednesday and the DLM Homemade Soup Station at DLM Washington Square alone has already replenished two of the six 11-quart soup wells located at the Deli’s Soup Station. Fast-forward 32 minutes and that number jumps to four. On a typical day, our Deli serves approximately 225 quarts of soup. Factor in the Soup Station also located near our Meat & Seafood department and that number jumps even more.

When it comes to DLM Homemade Soups, we’re often asked “what’s your secret?” Truth is, sometimes the best secret is the one that is painstakingly obvious—the soups are made from scratch daily using chef-driven recipes and the very same meats and vegetables you’ll find in our stores. Unlike the soups found on most “hot soup bars” that come from a bag or can, ours are Made Right Here in each store’s Kitchen, and that’s something we’re pretty proud of.

“Terms like ‘homemade’ and ‘made from scratch’ have kind of lost their worth in today’s marketplace. Most people see it as an advertising gimmick that doesn’t mean what it used to. At DLM, it means exacly what it says—no gimmicks, no false promises,” says Rick Mosholder, Kitchen manager at DLM Washington Square. “The ingredients used in our soups are the exact same items our customers can buy. There is no ‘secret’ or unobtainable items that we use. Just good quality products from start to finish.”

Jessica Prior, who manages the Kitchen at DLM Springboro agrees. “Made Right Here—it’s what puts DLM on the map and we take great pride in that,” she says. The Kitchen at DLM Springboro is bustling with activity. She walks from the Kitchen and heads over to the Produce department to grab some fresh cilantro, which she chops once back in the Kitchen and adds to a pot of chili simmering on the stove. Each store offers about 5-6 different types of soup each day, ranging from the ever-popular Mom’s Chicken Noodle and Tomato Bisque to the more exotic, like Pork Posole and Tom Yum Gai. “We try to make sure that each day’s selection offers something cream-based, broth-based as well as an option with chicken, beef, and a vegetarian choice,” Jessica says.

DLM Homemade Soups are so popular, there is a dedicated soup chef for each store’s Kitchen—speaking volumes to Made Right Here in action. “It makes us all feel good to know people enjoy it … knowing that puts a smile on our faces,” Jessica says.

Check out what soups we have available today at your favorite location!

Sweethearts Out There – Ditch the Reservations and Cook at Home!

Planning on going to an expensive steakhouse for Valentine’s Day?  Before you blow a whole lot of money hear me out.  I love to go out and eat. I appreciate everything our local restaurants do, plus I don’t have to cook or clean up.

One of my main pet peeves is that you go out and spend a fortune on what is quite frankly a pretty simple meal (plus wine and tip of course). Face it – the mark up on that bottle alone of wine costs you a pretty penny when you can spend the same amount of money and get a serious upgrade at retail.

DLM Shrimp Cocktail

It’s one thing if you are spending some serious time cooking from scratch say a good beef bourguignon and a chocolate soufflé that can be a little tricky but if you are going for that classic steakhouse kind of thing you can save some money and really ramp up the quality!

Let’s break it down – First course shrimp cocktail? It can’t get any easier to replicate this at home. Our fresh cooked plump shrimp cocktail can rival any local restaurant with its quality. Keep it nice and chilled and customize the cocktail sauce just the way you like it.

DLM Salad Bar

 

 

I know you all can handle making a good salad with what is available here at DLM every single day. You can even skip the prep work and make one exactly with what you want in it at our salad bars complete with from scratch housemade dressing (plus our new butter and salt DLM Croutons!)  Baked potatoes are easy enough to master but in case you want to cheat a little swing by and pick up our loaded or stuffed potatoes with the “works”.

DLM Natural Beef Rib Steak

Steak – You simply cannot find a better tasting higher quality one than right here. Simply season generously with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.  Need some info on steak? Click here or ask one of our experts in our meat department.

Chocolate Mousse

Cheese Course and Dessert?  Think of the options here –  cheese, fruits, and nuts from all over the world. The best French pastries, chocolate-dipped strawberries, decadent cheesecakes, and even chocolate mousse. Best part? No tipping, no designated driver, and the music playlist has all of your favorites!