The Words “Healthy Living”.

Do the words “Healthy Living” drum up images of nutrition and dieting trends? Or perhaps well-intentioned-but-unfruitful New Year’s resolutions? Maybe it isn’t an image; maybe it’s a feeling. A vague sense of guilt that weighs heavily on the chest as goal after goal goes unfulfilled.

I know it was for me.

Healthy living became some intangible thing that felt completely out-of-reach, much less attainable. If we’re honest with ourselves, sometimes healthy living feels more like a soy-free, gluten-friendly, dairy-free, vegan, keto, CBD nightmare than anything else. So, we don’t even try. And that is totally understandable in a world that is overly-saturated with the newest, hottest, you-won’t-be-healthy-without-it trends.

But fear not, friends.

The words “healthy living” don’t intimidate us here at Dorothy Lane Market. On the contrary, we are empowered by them. This demystification comes down to a crew of managers and associates that work tirelessly to make the road to healthier living something exciting and, more importantly, easily understood. They don’t just sell vitamins and protein bars. They attend seminars and trainings; they strive to procure products from reputable and reliable sources; they endeavor to build a bridge to the overwhelming world of health that is accessible to everyone.

Personally, Joanna at our Springboro location always blows me away with her breadth of knowledge. She makes selecting probiotics, multivitamins, hair supplements, etc. feel like an informed decision that I can handle, rather than an overwhelming one that I’d prefer to avoid. Even before I worked with her, Joanna was always ready to equip me with the information I needed to make good decisions about my health.

And that empowering energy is a company-wide point-of-pride. Joy and Kathy (Washington Square and Oakwood) and their associates share a similar philosophy. When you ask them a question, they want you to walk away feeling informed and confident, not intimidated. That personalized approach is an integral part of the DLM Difference, and it stems from a love for our customers that is unsurpassed.

So, whether it’s deciphering the difference between shelf-stable and refrigerated probiotics, or decoding the many (and often confusing) strengths of CBD oil, the Healthy Living Department is ready to help you. Their knowledge is vast, and their passion runs deep. (And speaking strictly from personal experience, they haven’t steered me wrong yet.)

If you’re on the journey toward better health, make DLM’s Healthy Living Department a stop along the way… I really don’t think you’ll regret it.

 

A Slice of Comfort: Grandma Tobias Pumpkin Pie

There’s something so comforting about a slice of good pumpkin pie. Perhaps it’s the memories that it evokes of special family members and their treasured recipes? Or, maybe it’s the great care that you can taste when you know a pie is baked from scratch?

We often hear that people love our Grandma Tobias Pumpkin Pie so much because it tastes homemade. The truth is that it is homemade, and we don’t skip a beat. We’ve resisted the temptation to take shortcuts in the baking process that may make things easier for us when making so many pies at once. For instance, Morgan Chrisman, Central Bakery Manager, notes that a good pumpkin pie batter when done right is very messy (as it should be). “Most places add so much flour to their pumpkin pie batter to make them easier for baking, but that results in less flavor when eating,” he says.

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Central Bakery’s Greg Tyzzer adds that a great pumpkin pie not only should taste rich yet creamy, but it should look good, too. He’s gone to great lengths to test and slightly tweak our recipe to achieve a smooth and slightly glossy top with a golden brown crust that’s buttery and flaky. Speaking of crust, it’s the foundation to any good pie and we start with an all-butter crust.

No matter what Thanksgiving looks like for you, we hope that you find comfort in our Grandma Tobias Pumpkin Pie.

Celebrating 2020 DLM Grads

Every year, we are extremely proud of the DLM associates who are graduating from high school or college. But this year’s class of 2020 is one we want to take a moment to especially recognize for their dedication to DLM and their community. You see, they’ve not only worked hard achieving their academic goals, but they’ve been an essential part of the DLM family during a time in history that very few will have experienced from the front lines of the grocery store. For some, this is their first working experience.

This year’s grads are among the DLM heroes who are dedicated to serving their community. You’ll see them in roles doing everything from cashier and carryout to helping to sanitize carts, like Olivia at DLM Oakwood and Brandon at DLM Springboro, to name a few. Also, as the demand for DLM Drive-Up, our online shopping experience, exploded overnight, grads like Kira and Kelly at Washington Square also have raised their hand to help, allowing us to further serve more households.

“When I think of the class of 2020, I think of their energy, happiness, and resiliency in the face of unprecedented challenge. We congratulate them and celebrate with them! They will always hold a special place in our heart,” says Calvin Mayne, DLM President. It’s with great admiration that we celebrate our 2020 graduates here at DLM—a true class act. These young stars won’t have the typical fanfare of graduation ceremonies, so please, take a moment to turn the page and view their smiling faces. And as you see them in the store, join us in congratulating them.

Emilia-Romagna: Savoring Every Bite

Emilia-Romagna is home to lots of delicacies that we couldn’t wait to bring to DLM for you to enjoy, too! Modena is one of my favorite cities in Europe, a land of fast cars and big flavors. A few years ago, we spent an afternoon with Maria Livia Manicardi touring her family’s estate where they produce their wonderful balsamic vinegars. She makes our DLM Balsamic Vinegars, including Aunt Angie’s Balsamic Vinegar, which is great for everyday use. Best of all, Maria creates our DLM Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. It’s a blend that we chose on site with Maria and we’re extremely proud to put our name on it. We think you will love its richness, depth, and complexity.

emilia-romagna

Maria Livia Manicardi produces our DLM Aged Balsamic Vinegar of Modena. On a visit, she offered us a sample directly from the barrel where it ages.

Just outside of Modena are the rolling hills where the Minelli family’s cows quietly graze. Modena is known not only for its balsamic vinegar and Prosciutto di Parma, but also for its Parmigiano-Reggiano, named after the provinces Parma and Reggio-Emilia. For more than a decade, we’ve been buying this cheese from the same family, brothers Valerio and Giovanni Minelli, and Giovanni’s son Carlo. As we toured their operation, Giovanni said something I’ve never heard before from a farmer. We were visiting the barn where the cows were eating fragrant hay, and he whispered “Look into their eyes. They are happy.” And we’re happy to enjoy so many wonderful foods from Reggio-Emilia!

Several of us spent a memorable afternoon enjoying food company, wine, and Parmigiano-Reggiano at the Minelli estate, overlooking the hills of Modena. This family produces our Parmigiano-Reggiano.

We hope you’ll enjoy the foods of Emilia-Romagna as much as we do!

Tulips: The Gateway to Spring

The arrival of spring comes in many different forms, but there’s nothing quite like the brilliant colors of tulips illuminating our Floral department. Stuart Delk, Floral & Plant Director says it best, “Tulips are the gateway to spring.” Simple, yet elegant, these blooms have become a favorite flower during this season. But how did tulips come to be so significant?

A member of the lily family, these flowers have a rich history. Because of its delicate nature and wide array of colors, this flower became a symbol of luxury in Europe. As the story goes, the price of tulips skyrocketed due to their extreme popularity and difficulty of cultivation. This frenzy is said to have caused a financial crash of the Dutch economy and caused what’s known as “Tulip Mania.” Although they have a complex past, or maybe thanks to it, tulips are celebrated each spring.

tulips

With their history rooted in the Netherlands, the idea that Dutch tulips are superior is a common misconception. Stuart states, “Dutch doesn’t necessarily mean quality.” We’re proud to receive our tulips from Mount Vernon, Washington. The cool maritime climate, defined by cold but not freezing winters transitioning to warm summers, paired with the fertile soil makes this location tulip paradise. In that area, spring has truly sprung when the fields are painted with these breathtaking blooms.

Throughout the month of April we will be carrying colorful cut tulips from Washington. Whether in a bouquet or an arrangement, these iconic flowers are a sure way to push away memories of the cold, wintry months and welcome spring with open arms.

Steps to Arranging Tulips Like a Pro

To keep flowers fresh, be sure to take them home and place in water as soon as possible.

  1. Clean your vase thoroughly. Flowers will last longer if the vase is free of contaminants.
  2. Fill vase with room temperature, clean water and flower food.
  3. Trim flower stems with a really sharp edge. A crushed edge may make it difficult for your flower to absorb the food and water.
  4. Place several tulips in vase. A fuller vase will lead to a better looking arrangement.
  5. Keep it simple! Tulips are beautiful as they are—there’s no need to add foliage.
  6. Find the perfect spot. Place your vase in an area that is away from sunlight and heat drafts. These will cause your flowers to wilt quickly.
  7. Give the stems a fresh cut frequently. Trim the tulip stems every 2-3 days as tulips continue to grow after they’re cut.

Irish Cheddars to Treasure

It seems that in March, everyone is a touch Irish and enjoys a pint or two of great Irish beer, particularly with that favorite American pastime—college hoops! However, Ireland is known for a plethora of wonderful food traditions and amongst our favorites are the cheeses!

Oscar Wilde Irish Cheddar is aged for two years and made with the milk of cows that are pasture fed during the months of milk production in County Cork.

Dubliner is like a Cheddar in texture but with the sweet, nutty taste of a Swiss and piquant flavor of an aged Italian-style cheese. It’s perfect with an Irish stout and charcuterie.

Cahill’s Irish Whiskey Cheddar, originally made for festive occasions, is now a year-round treasure. It’s made using Kilbeggan Irish Whiskey that lends a savory, rich tone. You’ll also love Cahill’s Irish Porter Cheese, which is odd-looking, but is perfect as the centerpiece on a cheese board.

Braising: The Art of the Winter Roast

Simply speaking, pot roasting or braising is cooking a tougher cut of meat gently and slowly in liquid until it becomes tender. This can result in a flavorful sauce that’s just waiting to be served with a starch or sopped up with DLM Artisan Bread.

The bonuses are plenty as not only does it make your house smell amazing but it feeds a crowd of people economically. And yes, it does tend to taste better after a day or two, so make enough for leftovers.

Braising Like a Pro:

CHOOSE THE RIGHT CUT OF MEAT

Good news—tougher cuts tend to be cheaper and they make the best braises. That combo of low and moist heat turns well-worked muscles, sinews, and connective tissue into rich, gelatinous, fall-off-the-bone deliciousness. Try: Chuck roasts, short ribs, pork shoulder, veal breast, lamb shanks, and chicken thighs. Bone–in meat imparts even more flavor.

braising

BROWN & SEAR LIKE THE BEST

This step creates the foundation flavors for the entire braise, resulting in gorgeous, deep golden-brown coloring. Browning takes time and space, so don’t crowd your pan as it may take multiple rounds! Heat a heavy-bottomed pan or Dutch oven with a little fat to start. Then, complete the following steps.

STEP 1: Remove browned meat from pan and start the next round of browning mirepoix, additional veggies, aromatics, etc. 

STEP 2: Deglaze pan using liquid. This helps those browned bits become liquid, reinforcing the dish’s foundation flavors. Use enough liquid to partially submerge the meat. More liquid yields a stew-like consistency while less results in a more concentrated, richer sauce.

STEP 3: Cover dish and either place in a low-heat oven (325°F or less) or low simmer on the stove. Note that the oven tends to be more consistent. How long? It depends on what you’re braising and the size of the cut. That’s the thing about braises—it’s done when it’s fork tender.

STEP 4: Season sauce to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a splash of acid, such as lemon juice or a glug of wine to brighten things up. Want the sauce thicker? Remove the meat and veggies and bring liquid to a strong simmer. Reduce until desired consistency and season.

POT ROAST 3-WAYS

GUINNESS BEEF STEW

Meat: Chuck roast cut into 2-inch pieces.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix, leeks, potatoes.
Deglazer: Guinness Stout.

BEEF IN BAROLO

Meat: Chuck roast.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix, pancetta, fennel, tomato.
Deglazer: A hearty dry red wine (try Barolo).

AMERICAN POT ROAST

Meat: Chuck roast.
Veggie Base: Mirepoix and potatoes.
Deglazer: Beef stock.

Soup That’s Made Right Here in Our Kitchens

It’s 11:24 a.m. on a Wednesday and the DLM Homemade Soup Station at DLM Washington Square alone has already replenished two of the six 11-quart soup wells located at the Deli’s Soup Station. Fast-forward 32 minutes and that number jumps to four. On a typical day, our Deli serves approximately 225 quarts of soup. Factor in the Soup Station also located near our Meat & Seafood department and that number jumps even more.

When it comes to DLM Homemade Soups, we’re often asked “what’s your secret?” Truth is, sometimes the best secret is the one that is painstakingly obvious—the soups are made from scratch daily using chef-driven recipes and the very same meats and vegetables you’ll find in our stores. Unlike the soups found on most “hot soup bars” that come from a bag or can, ours are Made Right Here in each store’s Kitchen, and that’s something we’re pretty proud of.

“Terms like ‘homemade’ and ‘made from scratch’ have kind of lost their worth in today’s marketplace. Most people see it as an advertising gimmick that doesn’t mean what it used to. At DLM, it means exacly what it says—no gimmicks, no false promises,” says Rick Mosholder, Kitchen manager at DLM Washington Square. “The ingredients used in our soups are the exact same items our customers can buy. There is no ‘secret’ or unobtainable items that we use. Just good quality products from start to finish.”

Jessica Prior, who manages the Kitchen at DLM Springboro agrees. “Made Right Here—it’s what puts DLM on the map and we take great pride in that,” she says. The Kitchen at DLM Springboro is bustling with activity. She walks from the Kitchen and heads over to the Produce department to grab some fresh cilantro, which she chops once back in the Kitchen and adds to a pot of chili simmering on the stove. Each store offers about 5-6 different types of soup each day, ranging from the ever-popular Mom’s Chicken Noodle and Tomato Bisque to the more exotic, like Pork Posole and Tom Yum Gai. “We try to make sure that each day’s selection offers something cream-based, broth-based as well as an option with chicken, beef, and a vegetarian choice,” Jessica says.

DLM Homemade Soups are so popular, there is a dedicated soup chef for each store’s Kitchen—speaking volumes to Made Right Here in action. “It makes us all feel good to know people enjoy it … knowing that puts a smile on our faces,” Jessica says.

Check out what soups we have available today at your favorite location!

World-Renowned Cookware Now Available!

Loved by chefs all over the world, Staub Cookware’s enamel coating makes it indestructible, highly chip resistant, and keeps it from discoloring. Unlike other enamel cast iron companies, Staub interior surfaces are black so they’re not prone to stain, scratch, or discolor.

StaubCookware

The cast iron retains heat, keeping the dish warm long after it’s been taken out of the oven or off the stove. It cooks food evenly, making the end result more consistent in texture and taste. The special ceramic bottom also makes it possible for use on all types of heating surfaces. We like it because you can take it straight from the oven or cooktop to the table.

Being a favorite of novice chefs and skilled professionals, it makes a great additional to any kitchen. We like to think of Staub as heirloom cookware that can be handed down for future generations of good cooks.

George Punter – The Vera & Calvin Mayne Good Neighbor Award

The Vera & Calvin Mayne Good Neighbor Award recognizes a DLM associate who goes above and beyond to better serve the DLM family or the community at large. We are proud to announce that George Punter, Wine & Beer Manager at DLM Washington Square, is this year’s recipient for his involvement with Camp Emanuel.

George Punter receives The Vera & Calvin Mayne Good Neighbor Award

Camp Emanuel hosts day and resident fun-filled camps aimed at integrating kids with and without disabilities through a number of activities, from arts and crafts to horseback riding, archery, and fishing. George first became involved with Camp Emanuel in 1996 as a board member upon his wife’s encouragement. She worked for 45 years as a special education teacher, but saw a connection to George since the camp’s chief fundraising efforts are done through wine silent auctions, often featuring collectors’ finds. After three years on the board, George learned that Camp Emanuel was in need of counselors, so he gave it a shot and has been doing it for nearly 20 years. “It was a life-changing experience for me,” says George.

In addition to assisting with the summer camp program, George is also instrumental in helping plan Camp Emanuel’s annual fundraiser in the spring. It’s a live wine auction that typically raises $35,000 within three hours and fuels Camp Emanuel’s mission to promote decision making, team building, positive self-esteem, and encourages understanding and acceptance between children.