Summertime, Sushi Time

So fresh, so good, and so summery! Beautiful days are meant to grab a picnic blanket to enjoy a meal outdoors. So why not keep things easy and go with DLM Sushi? Our Sushi case is always brimming with possibilities and we pride ourselves on a sushi experience that is restaurant quality (aka, this isn’t your average grocery store sushi!). Try Spicy Tuna Roll and California Roll, for instance. Or, order something custom to your liking.

 

 

Authentic sushi is truly an art, and we quickly learned a few years ago that it all starts with a skilled sushi chef. We are beyond grateful to have such expertise when it comes to DLM Sushi.

Ingredient is the next secret to our sushi. Just like anything at DLM, we are looking to raise the bar, and sushi is no exception. We’ve always prided ourselves on sourcing the best and the freshest fish for our Seafood department. It only made sense to use that same philosophy for sourcing fish used for our Sushi, as well as other ingredients. So grab your blanket and soak in some sunshine with DLM Sushi by your side.

Picnic Perfect: 3 New Deli Summer Sides

Our Deli has always been our pride and joy. There are so many classics as well as fun, modern sides that you just can’t find anywhere else. Why are we simply the best? Flavor. We don’t skimp on quality ingredients or take shortcuts as they are all Made Right Here in our Kitchens and you can taste it in every bite. Take our Classic Potato Salad for instance. We steam the potatoes fresh and use Hellmann’s mayo because we believe it just tastes better. Yes, we’ve spent a lot of time blind tasting a variety of mayonnaise, including one made from scratch, and Hellmann’s won, hands down! I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention our Chicken Salad as well, using freshly poached DLM Air-Chilled Chicken. In addition to these classic mainstays, get ready to make a little more room at your next picnic for these summery additions!

Lowcountry Coleslaw

Nothing says summer side dish more than coleslaw, and we have a feeling that this one is going to be a hit! No mayo in this one—just bright flavors that are perfect for an outdoor picnic. Made with green cabbage tossed with some diced carrots in a dressing that’s not too sweet and has a little kick from fresh ginger and jalapeño.

Avocado Salad

It’s not guacamole! Big chunks of fresh avocado and sweet grape tomatoes are tossed in a housemade lime vinaigrette made with fresh cilantro, garlic, and a smidge of DLM Classic Dijon Mustard. Added bonus? It’s VEGAN.

Lemon Pasta Salad

This clean and simple pasta salad screams summer. We toss al dente orecchiette with fresh lemon, basil, and a touch of roasted garlic. Try it served at room temperature as a base for grilled chicken or fish.

DLM Partners with 80 Acres for New Salad Blends

We are excited to work closely with Cincinnati-based 80 Acres, the next generation of fresh and locally grown produce. Not only are their lettuces, microgreens, and tomatoes grown year-round thanks to indoor farming techniques, but they use zero pesticides, food miles are kept to a minimum, and they use 100% renewable energy.

Big vision, right? Well, they’ve done it and they call it 80 Acres. The name comes not from the number of acres it takes to grow, but in how much food can be grown in a smaller space utilizing vertical farming techniques. This is a super-efficient method for growing that yields the equivalent of a farm with 80 acres of land, give or take.

It’s easy to see why we became fast friends. When talking to 80 Acres founders Mike Zelkind and Trish Livingston as well as Samantha Bergman, one of the first 80 Acres team members, it’s clear that they are doing what they love. Samantha joined the company when it was just a big vision—nearly 4.5 years ago. She had an immediate connection to 80 Acres Farms’ mission. Years ago, while living in Chile, Samantha experienced the benefits of fresh, locally grown food as she shopped in the markets. She felt better physically, but she also developed a deep emotional connection to the community that grew it. She knew that 80 Acres Farms was her opportunity to make that magic happen in her own community while making a positive impact on the planet.

Samantha was the first grower at the farm in Cincinnati. As the farm grew, she moved into the farm manager role and eventually found the path to business development. She realized that as much as she loved the plants, what she really enjoyed was finding the perfect partners for 80 Acres products and building relationships with them. From the early beginnings, she knew that Dorothy Lane Market would be a great partner and now she’s very excited to bring 80 Acres into the family of Dorothy Lane Market’s brand.

For that, we are grateful. We are excited to debut three new varieties of DLM Salad Blends together with 80 Acres. The Gem City Mix has crispy green ice lettuce and radish microgreens. Buckeye Bliss features green incised lettuce, green frilled lettuce, green and red romaine, with a dash of Dijon mustard microgreens. Then we have Frilly Leaf—green incised lettuce that will remind you of a frisée lettuce.

Bite-Sized Ways to Celebrate Your 2020 Grad

We realize the class of 2020’s school year isn’t ending as anyone would have expected. In lieu of those grandiose grad parties, you will likely be instead focusing on a nice intimate dinner and celebration with your household. With that in mind, we wanted to take a moment to highlight some bite-sized options for celebrating your grad and making them feel special.

Killer Brownie® Mini Trays

These pre-packed 7-inch trays come with four different Killer Brownie® flavors quartered and ready to dig in. Available in stores.

Laura’s Cookies

Whether you choose traditional grad cap designs or have something custom in mind, perhaps with your grad’s school colors, Laura and team have you covered. Minimum custom order is one dozen. 72-Hour Notice.

 

Graduation Cupcakes

With a number of cupcake and icing flavors to choose from, we are happy to bring something to life for your grad and customize it with an icing color and sprinkles with a nod to their alma mater. 24-Hour Notice.

Mini Sandwich Tray

Did you know that our Deli can customize a small size tray of our Mini Sandwiches with your choice of croissants or mini rolls, meat, and cheese. For sandwiches, choose from a variety of lunch meats, cheeses, or DLM Deli salads, such as Tuna, Egg, Old-Fashioned Chicken Salad, or Chicken Pecan. Vegetarian option available. Minimum 10 mini sandwiches per order. 24-Hour Notice.

Grad Cakes

Just because you aren’t having a big party doesn’t mean the tradition of a celebratory cake has to be cancelled too. Check out some of our smaller sizes, like a quarter sheet or an 8-inch round cake. Both are perfect for a more intimate gathering. With this size, we can still accommodate photo printing and custom messaging. 24-Hour Notice.

 

Chef Carrie Cooks: Lobster Cooking Tips

First off, it’s Lobstermania this Saturday at DLM, as we bring it to life with a Drive-Thru edition in light of recent circumstances. Get the details here. On Saturday, you can procure fresh, live or cooked Maine lobster while supplies last at a great price ($14 for live lobster; $15 for cooked), which is quite a deal for such quality of lobster weighing in at 1.25 lbs or larger. You can buy them already steamed fresh or you can do it at home. Follow my tips below for steaming or boiling live lobster, and before you know it, you’ll be serving up a couple for dinner alongside corn-on-the-cob and some of our Bakery’s Herb Cheddar Biscuits! Also below, are tips for reheating your cooked lobster.

To start, if you have never handled a live lobster, keep the bands on. Also, the lobster doesn’t “scream” when you start cooking it. If you do hear a noise it’s just the steam escaping from the shell.

LIVE LOBSTER COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Lobster Boiling Tips
Boiling a lobster is easy and probably the best way for cooking 4 or more at one time. Get a big pot and fill with fresh water about 2/3 full. Add 1 to 2 Tbsp of salt per gallon of water. Bring to a boil and add lobsters. Start the timer when the water comes back to a boil. You can figure 6-7 minutes for a 1.25-lb lobster, 7-9 minutes for 1.5-lb lobster, and 10-12 minutes for a 2-lb lobster.

Lobster Steaming Tips
Steaming lobster works great and tends to yield a more tender, less messy cooked lobster than boiling. Fill a large, deep pot with 2-3 inches of water. Bring to a boil, add the lobsters, cover, and steam, about 8 minutes per lb. How do you tell when it’s cooked?

Remember, sometimes the lobster may be undercooked even if the shell is entirely red. Double check that the meat is a creamy white color with no translucent areas. Give a good tug on one of the antennae and if it pops off, the lobster is done. You can also insert an instant read thermometer into the underside of the tail. It should read 135-140°F.

COOKED LOBSTER REHEATING INSTRUCTIONS

Did you skip the hassle and buy a pre-cooked lobster? No problem! Here is how you reheat when you are ready to serve. Wrap lobsters individually in foil. Place in a 350°F oven on a cooking sheet, belly up, and heat until warm. Or, place the foil-wrapped lobsters on the grill to warm.

20 Years of Laura’s Cookies: Get to Know Laura

For 30+ years, my five sisters, sister-in-law, and I have been baking Christmas cookies together. Every year, on the day after Thanksgiving we gather at my brother’s home, which my parents built themselves in 1954, and we bake dozens and dozens of cookies. When we first started our tradition, we had about a dozen different recipes that we made every year, but we were always looking for new recipes to add.

At least 25 years ago, my younger sister, Beth, shared a cookie recipe with me. She thought that it might be a good one to add to our Christmas baking list. It was a rolled cookie dough, but the taste reminded her of a drop sugar cookie that our mom would make for us. I loved the cookie dough, but I didn’t care for the royal icing that accompanied the recipe. The thick, soft sugar cookie did not seem to be enhanced by the hard, tasteless royal icing.

So, I developed my own special almond flavored frosting to complement the cookie. We decided that this combination was the ultimate “comfort cookie” and Laura’s Cookies was born. We soon referred to the cookie as the ultimate “comfort cookie”.

How did Laura’s Cookies develop from there?

In 1993 I moved to Dayton from Morristown, NJ. In the fall of 1999, I left my position as administrative director of surgical services at Miami Valley Hospital. I had been in hospital administration for my entire professional career (17 years) and decided that I wanted to move in a new direction with my career. What that direction would be, I had absolutely no idea.

I took full advantage of the assessment programs and career development sessions offered by a local career development firm. Through this experience. I found out a few things about myself. Most significantly, I seemed to have education/work experiences, skill sets, and a self-awareness of my strengths and weaknesses that indicated a potential to be a successful small business owner. I was intrigued—but what business could I start?

A one hour informational session by a representative of the local Small Business Administration led to me taking a 10-week SBA class at Sinclair Community College. The main goal of the course was to help individuals develop a “business plan.” So, I needed to identify what my business was going to be.

I had a few more expansive food business ideas, but the instructor was wise to inform me that my ability to secure financing would probably be slim. So, I scaled it back to a cookie baking business. Each week I would bring a variety of cookies to get feedback from my classmates and instructor. The “Comfort Cookies” (now known as “Laura’s Cookies”) became the most requested for “repeat” tastings.

At the end of the class I had a fairly decent business plan on paper; I just needed to figure out how to get it started. My primary challenge was to find a place to bake and sell my cookies.

Enter Dorothy Lane Market. How did you cross paths with DLM?

As a pet-owner, I needed to find a kitchen facility to bake in. I also needed an outlet to sell my cookies. This was 20 years ago. One of my book club friends had a relationship with Dorothy Lane Market through Scott Fox, DLM VP of Bakery. Through the friend, I was able to get a meeting with Scott. I met with him, explained that I had a cookie that everyone seemed to really like, but that I needed a place to bake. Scott expressed interest and shared that DLM likes to promote quality  “local” products. He asked me to bring in a sample.

A day later, I brought in 2-3 dozen “Laura’s Cookies” in different shapes. We met in the OAK Bakery manager’s office (a very pregnant Shelley Eberle). There are two things about this meeting that I will never forget. The first is Shelley opening the container, biting into a cookie, and then turning around in her chair exclaiming “this is the best cookie that I have ever had!” Scott tasted one and he agreed with Shelley, and asked if he could have samples to share with more folks at DLM. He called the next day and asked me when I could start baking!

What is it about Laura’s Cookies that you think makes them special?

I think that it is the fact that the cookies are both visually appealing and that they taste delicious. I trust Scott Fox when he tells me that he has never seen or tasted a cookie that even comes close to a Laura’s Cookie. They are truly unique.

Has the recipe changed at all over the years?

The only thing that has changed is that the “trans fats” have been removed from the ingredients. P.S. Don’t even ask about nutritional value. There is none. Just remember that everything is good in moderation!

When you first started, did you ever imagine Laura’s Cookies would have grown into what it is today?

Honestly, no (insert laughter). My informal business plan when I started was to make enough cookies to cover my living expenses, save for retirement, take a couple vacations a year, and maybe have a couple of employees.

Fast forward to 2020 and 5,337,000+ cookies later. Laura’s Cookies has a huge fan base, an amazing team, a new production facility, and I get to take those vacations!

Why exclusive to DLM?

Laura’s Cookies has been an exclusive product to Dorothy Lane Market from the beginning. DLM allowed me afterhours access to the bakery production area if I agreed to sell the cookies exclusively through their bakeries. Laura’s Cookies has become one of the DLM “destination products” as they aren’t available anywhere else. It has been a win-win relationship.

Sweetest memories over the past 20 years?

I think my favorite sweet memories are those shared with me by customers. Laura’s Cookies have become an essential part of so many people’s lives and celebrations. Major life events have been made even more special with Laura’s Cookies. Innumerable grandchildren have been delighted when a grandparent arrives with Laura’s Cookies in hand. Corporate clients look forward to holiday gift boxes of Laura’s Cookies. A gift of a single Laura’s Cookie can brighten someone’s day. It truly brings me joy to know that there is most assuredly “a happy memory in every bite”.

A few early memories stand out. When I first started, a former neighbor would go to the DLM Oakwood Bakery and stand near the case. She would casually point out my cookies to other customers, telling them how tasty they were and encouraging them to “try one!” I think our biggest marketing strategy has been the cookie itself with how it looks to the eye and tastes in the mouth.

I wasn’t in business more than a month when a DLM Washington Square associate came back into the production area to tell me about a customer interaction that she had just had. The customer was standing in front of the Bakery counter and kept saying to herself,  “I can’t believe that I’m doing this.” The associate asked if there was anything that she could do for her. The customer then explained that she lived in the Cincinnati area, but had been to Dayton the previous day. She had stopped at DLM and saw the Laura’s Cookies for the first time. She had bought three different shapes and didn’t even make it out of the DLM parking lot before they were gone. She made a special trip to Dayton and DLM the next day … for some more Laura’s Cookies!

Now, tell us more about THE Laura—you.

You really want to know more about me? When friends introduce me to someone new, it normally goes something like this:

“Do you ever go to Dorothy Lane Market?”
“Yes.”
“Have you ever had a Laura’s Cookie?”
“Yes,” or sometimes “No.”
“This,” they say, pointing at me “is THE Laura of Laura’s Cookies!” 

Invariably whether the individual has had a cookie or not, I end up telling my story. What I really want to say is …I’m more than just “THE” Laura.

So, I love to read both fiction and non-fiction. I’ve been a member of a book club since 1996 and, yes, we discuss the book before we get too deep into the wine! I love to travel. I enjoy photographing my travel adventures; perhaps a bit to the extreme. In fact, my nickname from my family is “clicky, clicky” as they are always trying to hurry me along. I enjoy live theater performances and movies. I’m a fairly accomplished gardener. It only took me 25 years to get my two-bit garden to have something in bloom from crocus to chrysanthemum! I am a National Public Radio and Podcast nerd. I know a little bit about a lot of things. Except Laura’s Cookies, I know a lot about Laura’s Cookies after 20 years.

Smart Substitutions When Cooking

Since it’s a little bit more complicated these days just to run out every time we are missing an ingredient, why not challenge your cooking skills and learn about making smart substitutions? With all of us cooking more at home and having a better stocked pantry, more than likely, you might have something in your kitchen that’ll work when you are missing an ingredient.

Here are some guidelines or suggestions to keep in mind when you need to swap out an ingredient. As you’re making your substitutions, there are a couple of important things to always keep in mind no matter what the ingredient is—flavor and texture. Cooking tends to be way more forgiving than baking does when you need to substitute an ingredient or two. But just like in life, learning to adapt and rise to the challenge can make life only more delicious. Enjoy and have fun in the kitchen with these smart substitutions by your side.

 

Herbs and Spices

A good rule of thumb to follow is that for every 1 tablespoon of fresh herbs, substitute 1 teaspoon of dried. Remember that dried herbs are more potent than fresh, so use sparingly. Herbs tend to fall into 2 categories, tender or sturdy. Tender includes bright, light floral herbs that are typically used fresh, like basil, chives, and cilantro to name a few.  Sturdy herbs tend to be more savory and are commonly found dried because of their oil content. These herbs include bay leaf, oregano, and thyme. For better substitute choices, stay within the same group or try similar flavors. For example, try subbing mint for basil or dried thyme for marjoram. Or try similar flavors, like onion or garlic powder with a little parsley as a replacement for chives.

Spices tend to fall into categories with similar or shared flavors. Here are a couple groupings: baking, like allspice, cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, fragrant spices, like fennel, saffron, cardamom, and coriander, warm or peppery varieties,  like chili powders, cumin, ginger, and mustard powder, and earthy types, like onion, garlic, and turmeric. The spices in each of those categories complement one another and can easily be swapped for one another.

 

Oils and Fats

Oils and fats are categorized by cooking properties based on either low smoke points or high smoke points. The low smoke point fats burn quickly and tend to be more solid, meaning that they perform best when using low-heat cooking methods, like sautéing. These fats include butter, bacon fat, margarine, and vegetable shortening. High smoke point fats, like canola oil, corn oil, grapeseed oil, and vegetable oil are best suited for high-heat cooking, such as frying. Pick one that will perform the way you want it to.

Dairy

Think about grouping dairy items based on texture. Sour cream, crème fraîche, and yogurt have similar textures and would make a good substitutes for one another. Buttermilk is easy to replicate with lemon juice or vinegar and milk. (1 Tbsp of lemon juice or vinegar for every cup of milk.)

No butter left? Try using oil for pan frying or sautéing instead. If you’re looking to add richness to a finished dish, try drizzling in a little cream.  

When subbing cheeses, be sure to look for varieties with similar textures. A good example of this would be switching out a Cheddar with a Gouda or Jarlsberg, all of which have similar textures.

 

Stock or Broth

Both help add flavor, but more importantly they add liquid. Of course you can substitute water, but in doing so you may also be diluting the flavor. I like using Better than Bouillon, a jar of reassurance that once opened lives quite contently in your fridge. It comes in a variety of flavors like beef, chicken and vegetable. White wine can also be handy for this, or try seasoning water with a little soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, or vinegar.

 

Produce

Different types of produce can be substituted based on the flavor and texture. Many root vegetables can be switched around with one another and will work well in almost any recipe. Greens can be divided into 2 categories, tender or firm. Some good examples of firm are escarole, kale, and turnip greens. Tender greens include mesclun, mâche, and spinach.

 

 

Meat

When substituting beef, I focus on the firmness of the meat—either tough or tender. Common substitutions are using brisket instead of chuck roast, New York strip in place of rib-eye, and vice versa.

Boneless chicken breasts and boneless chicken thighs can easily be swapped for one another. Keep in mind that cooking times may vary as you make this substitution.

Subbing for ground beef? Ground chicken, pork, turkey, and even sausage can work. You may just have to adjust for seasoning and fat content.

 

 

DIY Flower Arranging at Home

Take a break from the stresses of the present and rest your mind on the splendor of a sunset, that sip of coffee, or—perhaps—the relaxation of arranging fresh flowers. Here are some steps to keep in mind.

1. Start with flowers and colors that make you feel good. Our local ranunculus, Canadian tulips, and peonies are a great place to begin. They’re colorful, seasonal, and can’t help but cheer you up.

2. Give them a fresh cut right when you get home and get them in water. Flowers don’t like sitting out of water, whether they sit in your car or on the kitchen counter. A clean, sharp cut is best and allows the stems to take up water. Dull cuts and mashed stems will shorten the life of your flowers.

3. Narrow-mouth jars and vases will hold your flowers more upright. Wide-mouth containers will require more stems and will generally give a more relaxed presentation.

Tip: Cutting thin strips of clear tape and taping a grid pattern over the mouth of the vase helps hold stems upright.

4. Always use flower food. It greatly extends the life of flowers.

5. Work towards an overall balanced appearance, not exacting symmetry.

6. Start with larger flowers first.

7. Relax and enjoy what you’re doing.

8. Re-cut the stems every few days to make your flowers last even longer.

9. Enjoy your flowers!

Demystify How to Roast a Whole Chicken

Roasting a whole chicken is a skill that I think everyone should have in their cooking tool belt. It has the power to pleases almost everyone. The added bonus is that it makes your kitchen smell so darn good and is the ultimate comfort food. If you’re lucky enough to have leftovers, it can be used for all sorts of quick meals throughout the week. Check out these 5 ideas!

I like to say that a perfectly whole roasted chicken is the true sign of a good cook. You don’t need a lot of fancy equipment to master this skill—just a DLM Whole Chicken and a couple of cooking rules of thumb.

Whole Roasted Chicken
The time is now to master the skill of a whole roasted chicken.

 

How to Roast a Whole Chicken: What You Need to Know

Prep. Whatever you do, don’t roast a cold, wet bird. Let the chicken come to room temp (at least 30 minutes or more). This will help the bird cook more evenly and efficiently. Make sure the skin is dry. There’s no need to rinse the chicken you buy here at DLM. Dry skin yields a crisper and more crackly roasted surface.

Seasoning. You all have heard me say this before—do not be shy with the salt and pepper! Don’t forget to add it under the wings, the back, and even inside the cavity. Other goodies can be added inside the cavity, too, like chopped herbs, garlic, onion, and even a cut lemon, but there’s something so good about a simple salt and peppered roasted chicken.

What to roast it in. There are many pans out there. My answer is to use what you have. Different pans can give you different results, but all are delicious. For example, a roasting pan with a rack allows air to circulate under the bird, which helps brown the chicken all over and is brilliant if you want to carve it tableside for that “Norman Rockwell” presentation. Using a roasting pan without a rack will yield more pan juice and is an excellent way to roast veggies simultaneously, like  onions, carrots and potatoes, for a one-pan meal. My mom used to “roast” chicken in a deep-sided, covered Dutch oven, which technically wasn’t roasting, but delicious.

Temperature. You have two choices here—low and slow or hot and fast. Low and slow will yield a very tender, fall-off-the-bone type of meat with soft and sticky skin. Roast at 300°F to 350°F for anywhere between 1.5 to 2 hours.  The hot and fast method will yield a more crisp and dark golden brown exterior and a firmer, chewier meat inside. Roast at 375° to 500°F, 45 minutes to 1.5 hours depending on the weight of the chicken.

Is it done? Use a meat thermometer. It’s the easiest and most foolproof way to be sure. You are looking for it to read 165°F when you insert it into the thickest part of thigh.

Carving. Let it rest and hang out for at least 15 minutes before cutting. I know it can be torture waiting to dig in, but don’t blow it! You want those juices to redistribute or else you’ll end up with them all over your cutting board.

Lastly, don’t be intimidated. You will quickly master this and be on a journey of good cooking for years to come. Now, what to do with the leftovers? We’ve got 5 ideas to fuel your meal planning.

Recipes to Savor From Our Family to Yours

Here we are, hunkered down at home, making the best of things. We all need to eat, so why not eat well?! Imagine a platter of steaming hot pasta. Or the aroma of a large pot of Beef Bourguignon wafting through the house. Here in this issue of TABLE, we wanted to give you a few ideas to share good food and good feelings in your home. Few pleasures in life compare to eating together, so let’s savor it—with the people we love. We wish your family happiness and good health.

Swordfish Involtini with Sicilian Tomato Salad

 

Classic Potato Gnocchi with Parmigiano Cream Sauce

 

Spaghetti with Lemon-Parmigiano Sauce

 

Prosciutto di Parma Salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano

 

Savor more of our favorite recipes and meal ideas here!