Classic Strawberry Shortcake & 3 More Fruitful Endeavors

Nothing says summer like a layered strawberry shortcake with ripe berries and real whipped cream. Our Vera Jane’s Shortcakes, which are Made Right Here, are truly a DLM Difference. They are just the right size and aren’t overly sweet, so they hold up well with summer’s ripest berries and fruits.

So let’s forget the Twinkie-like sponge cakes and that gloppy red dye glaze. With our Vera Jane’s Shortcakes by your side and some fresh ingredients, your summer shortcake options are plentiful. Here are a few ideas from the classic strawberry to other fruitful endeavors.

Classic Strawberry Shortcake

Lemon Blueberry Shortcake

Peaches, Caramel, & Cream Shortcake

Tropical Fruit Shortcake

Pro Tips

• Another combo you can try is some fresh lime juice with a little honey or agave nectar to help create a little more juice for your cut fruit or berries.
• Try variations in whipped cream by adding a generous dollop of mascarpone cheese (try Vermont Creamery’s) or some malted milk powder for a different flavor profile. Or, switch it up by replacing the cream with yogurt.

Picnic Perfect: 3 New Deli Summer Sides

Our Deli has always been our pride and joy. There are so many classics as well as fun, modern sides that you just can’t find anywhere else. Why are we simply the best? Flavor. We don’t skimp on quality ingredients or take shortcuts as they are all Made Right Here in our Kitchens and you can taste it in every bite. Take our Classic Potato Salad for instance. We steam the potatoes fresh and use Hellmann’s mayo because we believe it just tastes better. Yes, we’ve spent a lot of time blind tasting a variety of mayonnaise, including one made from scratch, and Hellmann’s won, hands down! I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention our Chicken Salad as well, using freshly poached DLM Air-Chilled Chicken. In addition to these classic mainstays, get ready to make a little more room at your next picnic for these summery additions!

Lowcountry Coleslaw

Nothing says summer side dish more than coleslaw, and we have a feeling that this one is going to be a hit! No mayo in this one—just bright flavors that are perfect for an outdoor picnic. Made with green cabbage tossed with some diced carrots in a dressing that’s not too sweet and has a little kick from fresh ginger and jalapeño.

Avocado Salad

It’s not guacamole! Big chunks of fresh avocado and sweet grape tomatoes are tossed in a housemade lime vinaigrette made with fresh cilantro, garlic, and a smidge of DLM Classic Dijon Mustard. Added bonus? It’s VEGAN.

Lemon Pasta Salad

This clean and simple pasta salad screams summer. We toss al dente orecchiette with fresh lemon, basil, and a touch of roasted garlic. Try it served at room temperature as a base for grilled chicken or fish.

Chef Carrie Cooks: Lobster Cooking Tips

First off, it’s Lobstermania this Saturday at DLM, as we bring it to life with a Drive-Thru edition in light of recent circumstances. Get the details here. On Saturday, you can procure fresh, live or cooked Maine lobster while supplies last at a great price ($14 for live lobster; $15 for cooked), which is quite a deal for such quality of lobster weighing in at 1.25 lbs or larger. You can buy them already steamed fresh or you can do it at home. Follow my tips below for steaming or boiling live lobster, and before you know it, you’ll be serving up a couple for dinner alongside corn-on-the-cob and some of our Bakery’s Herb Cheddar Biscuits! Also below, are tips for reheating your cooked lobster.

To start, if you have never handled a live lobster, keep the bands on. Also, the lobster doesn’t “scream” when you start cooking it. If you do hear a noise it’s just the steam escaping from the shell.

LIVE LOBSTER COOKING INSTRUCTIONS

Lobster Boiling Tips
Boiling a lobster is easy and probably the best way for cooking 4 or more at one time. Get a big pot and fill with fresh water about 2/3 full. Add 1 to 2 Tbsp of salt per gallon of water. Bring to a boil and add lobsters. Start the timer when the water comes back to a boil. You can figure 6-7 minutes for a 1.25-lb lobster, 7-9 minutes for 1.5-lb lobster, and 10-12 minutes for a 2-lb lobster.

Lobster Steaming Tips
Steaming lobster works great and tends to yield a more tender, less messy cooked lobster than boiling. Fill a large, deep pot with 2-3 inches of water. Bring to a boil, add the lobsters, cover, and steam, about 8 minutes per lb. How do you tell when it’s cooked?

Remember, sometimes the lobster may be undercooked even if the shell is entirely red. Double check that the meat is a creamy white color with no translucent areas. Give a good tug on one of the antennae and if it pops off, the lobster is done. You can also insert an instant read thermometer into the underside of the tail. It should read 135-140°F.

COOKED LOBSTER REHEATING INSTRUCTIONS

Did you skip the hassle and buy a pre-cooked lobster? No problem! Here is how you reheat when you are ready to serve. Wrap lobsters individually in foil. Place in a 350°F oven on a cooking sheet, belly up, and heat until warm. Or, place the foil-wrapped lobsters on the grill to warm.

Your Guide to the Prepared Pantry

Now more than ever we are all cooking at home. For a lot of us who eat out, you might be facing a serious wake up call in the kitchen. Getting your pantry prepared and well organized is one of the most important steps not only in a professional kitchen, but your home one, too, so we’ve create a guide to the prepared pantry. Having and keeping the staples in your pantry or cupboard as well as in your fridge and freezer can make cooking at home just plain simple and fast because you already have the ingredients. Don’t forget to make a list before you leave to shop. (Download our printable shopping list here.) It’ll help you become a more efficient shopper, think in terms of meal planning, and use what you already have on hand.

 

Since we are all spending more time doing home projects, like cleaning out our closets, why not spend some quality time taking a good look at what’s already in your pantry, fridge, and freezer? If you haven’t used an item in a year, it might be time to throw it out! Although expiration, best by, and sell by dates can be confusing, they tend to be a good guideline on making the decision to keep or pitch. Take a good look at what you have left. Fill in the missing holes with items you’re consistently using and find yourself always cooking with. Just by adding a couple fresh ingredients, those pantry staples can give you so many options for baking and cooking.


Your Guide to the Prepared Pantry Checklist

Here are some of my staples that I try to have on hand to help me cook every day. For the most part, they are items that have a shelf life. Don’t wait until these run out to restock them. Instead, think about creating a par level at home so you can always come up with something delicious to cook!

>>DOWNLOAD YOUR GUIDE TO THE PREPARED PANTRY CHECKLIST<<

Or, keep reading below!

OILS & VINEGARS

BASIC:

– Extra-virgin olive oil
– A neutral cooking oil like canola or grapeseed
– Red-wine vinegar
– White vinegar
– Apple cider vinegar

ADVANCED:

– Peanut oil
– Coconut oil
– Sesame oil
– Sherry or balsamic vinegar
– Walnut oil
– Rice vinegar
– Mirin

DAIRY & CHARCUTERIE

BASIC:

– Eggs
– Milk
– Butter
– Cheeses like Parmigiano-Reggiano, Cheddar, Gruyère, feta
– Plain full-fat yogurt or sour cream
– Bacon
– Hard salami or sausages

ADVANCED:

– More cheeses like Pecorino Romano & blue
– Pâté
– Prosciutto or other cured artisan ham or meats

GRAINS & STARCHES

BASIC:

– Long-grain white rice
– Whole grains like quinoa or farro
– Dried pastas
– Plain bread crumbs
– Crackers
– Canned beans

ADVANCED:

– Dry lentils
– Rice noodles
– Specialty rice like basmati or Arborio
– Brown rice
– Panko bread crumbs
– Dry beans
– Specialty pastas like bucatini or farfalle
– Whole grains like spelt, pearl barley, or teff

NUTS & NUT BUTTERS

BASIC:

– Peanut butter
– Almond butter
– Pecans
– Walnuts
– Almonds
– Peanuts

ADVANCED:

– Pumpkin seeds
– Pistachios
– Tahini
– Pine nuts
– Hazelnuts

SPICES & DRIED HERBS

BASIC:

– Kosher salt
– Red pepper flakes
– Ground Cayenne
– Chili powder
– Curry powder
– Bay leaves
– Black peppercorns
– Sweet paprika
– Ground cinnamon
– Ground cumin
– Garlic powder or granulated garlic
– Dried thyme and dried oregano

ADVANCED:

– Flaky salt
– Ground coriander
– Dried dill
– Turmeric
– Smoked paprika
– Cardamom
– Za’atar
– Allspice
– Fennel seeds
– Dry mustard
– Garam masala
– Chinese 5-spice powder
– Whole nutmeg
– Sumac
– Cumin seeds
– Coriander seeds

CANNED & JARRED GOODS

BASIC:

– Soups
– Tuna
– Tomato paste
– Diced tomatoes
– Tomato sauce
– Chicken or vegetable stock
– Beans
– Pickles
– Fruit jams and preserves
– Anchovies
– Olives
– Maple syrup

ADVANCED:

– Clams
– Sardines
– Cornichons
– Preserved lemons
– Unsweetened coconut milk
– Capers
– Pickled hot peppers
– Kimchi

CONDIMENTS & SAUCES

BASIC:

– Dijon and yellow mustard
– Mayonnaise
– Ketchup
– Hot sauce
– Salsa
– Soy sauce
– Worcestershire sauce
– BBQ sauce

ADVANCED:

– Whole grain mustard
– Hoisin
– Thai red curry paste
– Fish sauce
– Anchovy paste
– Harissa
– Gochujang
– Mango chutney
– Miso
– Wasabi
– Chinese oyster sauce
– Asian chili bean pastes

BAKING

BASIC:

– All-purpose flour
– Cornmeal
– Rolled oats
– Cornstarch
– Baking soda
– Baking powder
– Pure vanilla extract
– Granulated sugar
– Light brown sugar
– Dark brown sugar
– Confectioners’ sugar
– Bittersweet baking chocolate
– Semisweet chocolate chips
– Raisins or other dried fruits
– Cocoa powder

ADVANCED:

– Cake flour
– Whole wheat flour
– Dark baking chocolate
– Vanilla beans
– Almond extract
– Powdered gelatin
– Molasses
– Light corn syrup
– Buttermilk powder
– Active dry yeast

PRODUCE

BASIC:

– Garlic
– Onions
– Potatoes (Yukon Gold or Russet)
– Lemons
– Carrots
– Celery
– Apples
– Oranges
– Bananas
– Greens like lettuce or kale
– Broccoli
– Parsley
– Any favorite herbs

ADVANCED:

– Ginger
– Avocados
– Cilantro
– Scallions
– Limes
– Jalapeños
– Shallots
– Specialty herbs like mint, rosemary, and lemongrass
– Peppers

FREEZER

BASIC:

– Chicken
– Ground beef
– Sausage
– Thick fish fillets
– Shrimp
– Sliced bread
– Frozen veggies like corn, peas, and spinach
– Frozen fruits like peaches, berries, and mangos (excellent for baking or smoothies)
– Ice cream
– Bread dough or rolls

ADVANCED:

– Puff pastry
– Pancetta
– Stock
– Fresh pasta
– Vegetables like green beans, cauliflower, broccoli, edamame, and artichoke hearts


Check Out These 5 Meals to Make from the Prepared Pantry List

1. Beans & Greens

2. Clam Pasta

3. Crunchy Roasted Chickpeas

4. Restaurant-Style Tomato Soup

5. Caramel Banana Cake

Download Our Printable Shopping List Here

Smart Substitutions When Cooking

Since it’s a little bit more complicated these days just to run out every time we are missing an ingredient, why not challenge your culinary skills and learn about making smart substitutions when cooking? With all of us cooking more at home and having a better stocked pantry, more than likely, you might have something in your kitchen that’ll work when you are missing an ingredient.

Here are some guidelines or suggestions to keep in mind when you need to swap out an ingredient. As you’re making your substitutions, there are a couple of important things to always keep in mind no matter what the ingredient is—flavor and texture. Cooking tends to be way more forgiving than baking does when you need to substitute an ingredient or two. But just like in life, learning to adapt and rise to the challenge can make life only more delicious. Enjoy and have fun in the kitchen with these smart substitutions when cooking by your side. Also, be sure to keep your pantry fully stocked with our guide to the prepared pantry!

 

Smart Substitutions When Cooking

Herbs and Spices

A good rule of thumb to follow is that for every 1 tablespoon of fresh herbs, substitute 1 teaspoon of dried. Remember that dried herbs are more potent than fresh, so use sparingly. Herbs tend to fall into 2 categories, tender or sturdy. Tender includes bright, light floral herbs that are typically used fresh, like basil, chives, and cilantro to name a few.  Sturdy herbs tend to be more savory and are commonly found dried because of their oil content. These herbs include bay leaf, oregano, and thyme. For better substitute choices, stay within the same group or try similar flavors. For example, try subbing mint for basil or dried thyme for marjoram. Or try similar flavors, like onion or garlic powder with a little parsley as a replacement for chives.

Spices tend to fall into categories with similar or shared flavors. Here are a couple groupings: baking, like allspice, cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, fragrant spices, like fennel, saffron, cardamom, and coriander, warm or peppery varieties,  like chili powders, cumin, ginger, and mustard powder, and earthy types, like onion, garlic, and turmeric. The spices in each of those categories complement one another and can easily be swapped for one another.

Oils and Fats

Oils and fats are categorized by cooking properties based on either low smoke points or high smoke points. The low smoke point fats burn quickly and tend to be more solid, meaning that they perform best when using low-heat cooking methods, like sautéing. These fats include butter, bacon fat, margarine, and vegetable shortening. High smoke point fats, like canola oil, corn oil, grapeseed oil, and vegetable oil are best suited for high-heat cooking, such as frying. Pick one that will perform the way you want it to.

Dairy

Think about grouping dairy items based on texture. Sour cream, crème fraîche, and yogurt have similar textures and would make a good substitutes for one another. Buttermilk is easy to replicate with lemon juice or vinegar and milk. (1 Tbsp of lemon juice or vinegar for every cup of milk.)

No butter left? Try using oil for pan frying or sautéing instead. If you’re looking to add richness to a finished dish, try drizzling in a little cream.  

When subbing cheeses, be sure to look for varieties with similar textures. A good example of this would be switching out a Cheddar with a Gouda or Jarlsberg, all of which have similar textures.

 

Stock or Broth

Both help add flavor, but more importantly they add liquid. Of course you can substitute water, but in doing so you may also be diluting the flavor. I like using Better than Bouillon, a jar of reassurance that once opened lives quite contently in your fridge. It comes in a variety of flavors like beef, chicken and vegetable. White wine can also be handy for this, or try seasoning water with a little soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, lemon juice, or vinegar.

 

Produce

Different types of produce can be substituted based on the flavor and texture. Many root vegetables can be switched around with one another and will work well in almost any recipe. Greens can be divided into 2 categories, tender or firm. Some good examples of firm are escarole, kale, and turnip greens. Tender greens include mesclun, mâche, and spinach.

 

Meat

When substituting beef, I focus on the firmness of the meat—either tough or tender. Common substitutions are using brisket instead of chuck roast, New York strip in place of rib-eye, and vice versa.

Boneless chicken breasts and boneless chicken thighs can easily be swapped for one another. Keep in mind that cooking times may vary as you make this substitution.

Subbing for ground beef? Ground chicken, pork, turkey, and even sausage can work. You may just have to adjust for seasoning and fat content.

Demystify How to Roast a Whole Chicken

Roasting a whole chicken is a skill that I think everyone should have in their cooking tool belt. It has the power to pleases almost everyone. The added bonus is that it makes your kitchen smell so darn good and is the ultimate comfort food. If you’re lucky enough to have leftovers, it can be used for all sorts of quick meals throughout the week. Check out these 5 ideas!

I like to say that a perfectly whole roasted chicken is the true sign of a good cook. You don’t need a lot of fancy equipment to master this skill—just a DLM Whole Chicken and a couple of cooking rules of thumb.

Whole Roasted Chicken
The time is now to master the skill of a whole roasted chicken.

 

How to Roast a Whole Chicken: What You Need to Know

Prep. Whatever you do, don’t roast a cold, wet bird. Let the chicken come to room temp (at least 30 minutes or more). This will help the bird cook more evenly and efficiently. Make sure the skin is dry. There’s no need to rinse the chicken you buy here at DLM. Dry skin yields a crisper and more crackly roasted surface.

Seasoning. You all have heard me say this before—do not be shy with the salt and pepper! Don’t forget to add it under the wings, the back, and even inside the cavity. Other goodies can be added inside the cavity, too, like chopped herbs, garlic, onion, and even a cut lemon, but there’s something so good about a simple salt and peppered roasted chicken.

What to roast it in. There are many pans out there. My answer is to use what you have. Different pans can give you different results, but all are delicious. For example, a roasting pan with a rack allows air to circulate under the bird, which helps brown the chicken all over and is brilliant if you want to carve it tableside for that “Norman Rockwell” presentation. Using a roasting pan without a rack will yield more pan juice and is an excellent way to roast veggies simultaneously, like  onions, carrots and potatoes, for a one-pan meal. My mom used to “roast” chicken in a deep-sided, covered Dutch oven, which technically wasn’t roasting, but delicious.

Temperature. You have two choices here—low and slow or hot and fast. Low and slow will yield a very tender, fall-off-the-bone type of meat with soft and sticky skin. Roast at 300°F to 350°F for anywhere between 1.5 to 2 hours.  The hot and fast method will yield a more crisp and dark golden brown exterior and a firmer, chewier meat inside. Roast at 375° to 500°F, 45 minutes to 1.5 hours depending on the weight of the chicken.

Is it done? Use a meat thermometer. It’s the easiest and most foolproof way to be sure. You are looking for it to read 165°F when you insert it into the thickest part of thigh.

Carving. Let it rest and hang out for at least 15 minutes before cutting. I know it can be torture waiting to dig in, but don’t blow it! You want those juices to redistribute or else you’ll end up with them all over your cutting board.

Lastly, don’t be intimidated. You will quickly master this and be on a journey of good cooking for years to come. Now, what to do with the leftovers? We’ve got 5 ideas to fuel your meal planning.

New Look, New Year, New Classes!

We’ve ramped up our style and are bringing you a more modern look to match what we’ve got going on in the DLM Culinary Center. Love food and want to learn, talk, and share it with others? Our cooking classes, interactive dinner parties, and other events are a great way to have fun and eat some amazing food. Come in and see what we’ve got going on in 2020—it’s absolutely delicious!

View Our Full Cooking Class Schedule!

COOKING CLASSES

Our classes are designed for home cooks with busy lifestyles who have a passion for food. We offer both an intimate hands-on experience and demonstration classes covering a wide range of delicious topics, including kids’ camps, family nights, couples dinner parties, 5-course food and wine events, to name a few!
Now enrolling at DorothyLane.com/CulinaryCenter

PRIVATE EVENTS & COOKING PARTIES

Whether your goal is to entertain VIP clients, celebrate a family birthday, or host a shower, we can offer a fun, educational, and unique experience. We can create any combination of hands-on or demonstration activity, or just simply support your event by catering in our unique space. As with any event at the DLM Culinary Center, you choose your level of culinary participation.

CORPORATE & TEAM BUILDING EVENTS

Our professional chefs help your colleagues work together in a cohesive, positive, and efficient way to create a delicious meal together. Not only will your team learn some cooking skills, but they’ll have fun working together.

MEETINGS & KITCHEN RENTALS

Get out of the same-old conference room and host your meeting here! Filled with plenty of natural light, the DLM Culinary Center can support your team throughout the meeting with breakfast, lunch, yummy snacks, and beverages.

View Our Full Cooking Class Schedule!

Reliving the Party: The Food & Wine Show

After DLM throws the annual Food & Wine Show, we spend more than a couple of days reviewing all of the pieces that make this event so special. Now that we’ve had time to look back, I thought I’d share some fun Food & Wine Show facts!

• We were thrilled that the “Big Chill” waited until this week so we could get over 600 folks through our doors for the start of the party in less than 15 minutes!

• Happy to report that all fingers are accounted for after shucking 1,000 oysters and cutting 1,000+ pieces of sushi.

• Our servers happily trayed and presented over 4,400 individual hors d’oeuvres.

• We made batch after batch of cheese risotto finishing it in a 90 lb wheel of Grana Padano, which is similar to Parmigiano-Reggiano.

• We had a wonderful representation this year of wine regions and varietals. From rare connoisseur picks to everyday delights, there was truly something for everybody.

• We hope everyone enjoyed the live jazz music from band leader Mike and his mates. This year he celebrated 20 years of entertaining our guests during the show.

• We’re thankful for our 140 associates who help us put this together and make it successful every single year.

Thank you to all who attended this year’s show and to those who helped make this event unforgettable. Mark your calendars for the 2020 Food & Wine Show, happening Thursday, November 5. We are now ready for the holidays to begin!

Thanksgiving Turkey Prep: 3 Methods to Try

I love all the November food magazines, blogs, and chefs all claiming they have finally found the best way to cook a turkey. Truth is, there is no one and only best way to cook it. Deciding on the desired end results will help the home cook figure out which particular cooking method can get them there.

Lots of families want the whole roasted bird as the centerpiece of their holiday table. While others want crispy, crackly skin with juicy tender meat inside, sans the stress of carving at the table. Some of us want a simple method that yields easy clean up, with just enough breast meat leftover for sandwiches. Others are in it for the adventure! Whatever you’re looking for, here are three ideas for how to prepare your locally raised Non-GMO DLM Free-Range Turkey, the turkey that’s the talk of the town!

1. The Traditional Whole Roasted Turkey

Step 1: Remove the neck and gizzards and discard or place in the bottom of the roasting pan if you desire. Rinse the turkey, drain well, and pat dry.

Step 2: Rub skin with Vera Jane’s Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and season well with Kosher salt and DLM Grilling & Seasoning Rub.

Step 3: Fill the cavity with celery, onion, and a quartered lemon. Add an inch of water to the pan and roast covered (uncover at end to lightly brown).

Step 4: Pull when meat thermometer reads 165ºF in the thigh. Let turkey rest for 15-20 minutes before carving. It’s that simple! Hint: If turkey is too large to fit in your pan, see No. 3 below for a Spatchcocked Turkey.

2. Turkey Breast

We all know that dark meat is the most flavorful, but for those white meat fans, roasting a turkey breast is just the ticket.

Step 1: Try rubbing it with an herb butter, either making your own or using our DLM Herb Butter from The DLM Cheese Shop. Rub all over the outside and even tuck some under the skin!

Step 2: Choose a pan that’s slightly larger than your breast. Add about an inch of liquid to it. Try DLM Premium Turkey Broth or channel your inner Ina Garten and use white wine.

Step 3: Cook low and slow to keep meat from drying out. Preheat oven to 325ºF and cook until it reaches 165ºF.

2. Spatchcocked

The benefits are plenty—cut down on cooking time and maximize that crispy skin!

Step 1: Remove turkey’s backbone using a good pair of kitchen shears. Or, ask our Meat department associates to do this for you. Flatten turkey in pan, breast-side up, pushing down on breast bones. Pull thighs outward.

Step 2: Rub with Vera Jane’s Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper on both sides! Or, use a dry brine for extra crispy skin. Sit turkey uncovered overnight in the fridge.

Step 3: Cook to 165ºF. To carve, remove legs and wings and slice breast meat, paying attention to cut away from breastbone.

 

1 Chicken, 5 Meal Ideas

We are always on the lookout for some delicious meal shortcuts. As one of our go-tos, a whole roasted chicken is amazingly versatile as it can be used in a variety of  chicken meal ideas for the days to come. Plus, once you have a roasted chicken, the prep is pretty easy.

But first, you must start with a whole roasted chicken. Check out our tips for demystifying roasting a whole chicken. Then, see below for 5 meal ideas for the days to come!

Thai Peanut Noodles
This quick and easy recipe for Thai Peanut Noodles is a great way to use chicken.

 

Idea 1: Thai Peanut Noodles

Pull chicken off the bone and slice into thin strips. Toss the strips with some pasta (I like either rice noodles or spaghetti for this). Add to it any of these mix-ins: Thai peanut or sweet chili sauce, a splash of soy sauce, julienned carrots, diced green onions, and chopped DLM Extra-Large Peanuts. Then, drizzle with some Sriracha.

Idea 2: Chicken Tortellini Soup

Shred chicken and set aside. In a soup pot, sauté a small amount of soup veggie starters, such as chopped onion, celery, and carrots, in a little Vera Jane’s Extra-Virgin Olive Oil until soft. Add several cups of your favorite stock and season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then lower heat. Add a package of tortellini and the shredded chicken; let simmer until tender. Serve with some crusty DLM Artisan Farmhouse Bread.

Idea 3: One Pan Chicken Enchiladas

In a non-stick skillet, layer your favorite enchilada sauce, a couple corn tortillas, and a container of DLM Roasted Tomatillo Salsa or your favorite salsa. Top with shredded chicken and some shredded Monterey Jack cheese. Cover and gently simmer for about 15-20 minutes. Finish under the broiler for a delicious cheesy crust and serve with a little sour cream and a dollop of DLM Homemade Guacamole.

Idea 4: Chopped Chicken Salad

Grab your favorite bagged leaf salad (I like a spinach and arugula mix) and toss in some shredded chicken. Throw in a couple of your favorite add-ins, such as drained black beans, diced jicama, green onions, chopped tomatoes, shredded Cheddar, and crunchy tortilla strips. Then, toss it all together with ranch dressing and a dollop of your favorite DLM Salsa.

Idea 5: BBQ Chicken Sandwiches

Shred the chicken and mix it up with some of our DLM Original Barbecue Sauce. Gently reheat if necessary and pile into our Bakery’s Golden Hamburger Buns. Try it topped with briny pickles, smoked Gouda, or our Homestyle Coleslaw.