Journey to the Pacific Northwest: Nature’s Bounty Awaits

What’s not to like about the Pacific Northwest? From the beautiful rocky coastline to dense rainforests, the culinary treasures foraged from this region are thanks to its rivers and huge expanses of fertile farmland nestled between majestic mountains. Think salmon, halibut, and oysters along with hazelnuts, mushrooms, apples, world-renowned wines, and all sorts of summer berries. The list goes on.

Pike Place Market is often the highlight when visiting Seattle where the yearlong market caters to everyone’s inner foodie. Plus, there are plenty of gorgeous flowers and you’ll be delighted by the theater of fish being tossed to and fro.

Considered the birthplace of America’s coffee infatuation, the Pacific Northwest is home to nationally recognized roasters, boutique espresso bars, and the smallest pop-up stands alongside the road. One can find a good cup of coffee literally everywhere!

Wineries dot the landscape in both Washington and Oregon, along with craft beer, award-winning cheese producers, and artisan charcuterie maker Olympia Provisons. All of these are available right here at DLM.

I was lucky enough to go to culinary school while I lived in the Seattle region and had a blast going to the market to buy what was seasonally available. Afterward, I’d roll up my sleeves and get busy cooking. Living here in Dayton, I get the same vibe whenever I walk into work.

It’s nice to know that with DLM right down the street, we all can get a similar experience without boarding an airplane or trying to figure out how much it will cost to airship that salmon home. Plus, I don’t have to cram all of those Chukar Cherries in my suitcase anymore. Almost all of those quintessential ingredients and items are available right here at our local year-round market!

Earn Bonus Points this month on Pacific Northwest finds throughout our stores with the use of your Club DLM card!

Pacific Northwest Recipes

Pan Bagnat: A Picnic-Perfect Sandwich

Pan Bagnat is the iconic French make-ahead sandwich that’s perfect for outdoor eating. Think Salade Niçoise, but in sandwich form. We love making it on our DLM French Boule, but you also can build this luscious Provençal French-style sandwich on our DLM Artisan French Baguette or Ciabatta. From there, a good quality tuna packed in oil partners up with the flavors within, melding with the sliced egg, ripe tomato, olive tapenade, and slivered onion. The magic happens though when it’s made ahead of time, even overnight. Wrap it tightly before refrigerating so that all of the flavors can beautifully mingle to season the sandwich.

Get the Recipe!

PICNIC-PERFECT SIDE RECIPES

Complete your picnic with the perfect sides! Try our recipes for a French-Style Potato and Green Bean Salad and Celery Root Salad.

The Great Clam Chowder Debate

New Englanders take serious pride in their New England clam chowder, which you can easily find being slurped up at lobster shacks and roadside diners as well as top-rated restaurants. The famed cream-based soup has been around for a long time, being served in Boston in the early 1800s at the Union Oyster House (one of our country’s oldest continuously operating restaurants).

But the rivalry started when a Manhattan version was created in the 1930s that was tomato based. It caused such an uproar that in 1939, a bill was introduced in Maine to ban the use of tomatoes in clam chowder. It did not pass and has been an ongoing debate ever since.

clam chowder

The difference is visible—there’s no mistaking the two. Both are delicious and have the briny, sweet flavor of clams. The New England version tends to be richer and thicker whereas the Manhattan chowder is more vegetal with a lighter, more brothy base. I love that both styles can support my habit of using plenty of hot sauce and oyster crackers!

This month, our Seafood department will be making both New England and Manhattan Chowders (available in the hot soup well located by the Seafood department and in the soup grab ‘n go area). Come in and try our take on both styles of clam chowder. Then, we want to hear what you think! Take our Great Chowda Debate poll on our Facebook page.

Food Explorer New England Eats

EXPLORE NEW ENGLAND EATS

New Englanders have a fierce loyalty for their home towns and their patriotic history. Between the cordial quirkiness of the small towns, the buzz of big city Boston, old fishing ports, stunning architecture, plus the great outdoors—road tripping through New England is a must, especially as the beginning notes of summer are starting to play in May. We get it—miles and miles of gorgeous coastlines, picturesque lighthouses, quaint towns, and tons of outdoor activities. But let’s talk about the food—think succulent seafood from the land of lobster, as well as plump, briny oysters and clams for days. So many lobster and clam shacks, so little time! You’ll also find a plethora of local farmers’ markets (and Maine blueberries), renowned cheesemakers, breweries, and bakeries with whoopie pies piled high. What’s not to like? As we gear up for Lobstermania, May 29, we’ll be celebrating New England foods and recipes all month! So come get a taste of how delicious summer can be with these New England eats.

>Get our New England Eats checklist here!

Rancho Gordo Heirloom Beans

The wait list is 18+ months … just to join a bean club? Why wait when you can get Rancho Gordo’s gorgeous heirloom dried beans right here at DLM (or have them shipped via shop.dorothylane.com)? Between the rise in pantry cooking and press coverage from Food & Wine Magazine, The New York Times, and Bon Appétit (to name a few), Rancho Gordo beans are crazy cool right now. Each heirloom variety has its own unique characteristics, flavor profile, and history—and the recipes are plenty. So why not forego the can and give good heirloom dried beans a chance?

BASIC DRIED BEAN TIPS

• Store dry beans in a cool, dark place.
• 1 cup of dried beans yields about 3 cups of cooked.
• No time to soak? Don’t worry! Go ahead and cook them knowing it’ll take a bit longer.
• Simple seasonings speaks volumes, like adding a ham bone or cooking in stock. A little bacon fat or olive oil helps add depth of flavor.
• Cook in the soaking water and add salt after the beans are tender.
• Store leftover cooked beans in the fridge for up to 5 days or freeze.
• Keep the cooking liquid handy. Store leftover beans in the liquid

 

CHECK OUT THESE DELICIOUS RECIPES SHOWCASING RANCHO GORDO HEIRLOOM BEANS!

PASTA E FAGIOLI

 

CASSOULET BEANS IN SAVORY TOMATO SAUCE

 

FLAGEOLET SALAD WITH LEMON, RADISHES, AND ROASTED TOMATOES

What’s for Dinner Valentine’s Edition: Surf and Turf

Why not have the best of both land and sea on your dinner plate? Classic surf and turf was popularized in the 1960s when it was featured at the restaurant that sat atop the Space Needle in Seattle during the 1962 World’s Fair. So where is the best place to get it here in Ohio? DLM of course! And our stuffed lobster tail and beef filet are so deliciously decadent!

Whether you want the best of both worlds on each dinner plate this Valentine’s Day, or you’re willing to share with your sweetie, we’ve got you covered. For the surf, we are featuring a Stuffed Lobster Tail that can be easily cooked at home (keep reading for more details about this catch)! For the turf, there’s nothing better than a DLM Natural Beef Filet Mignon, cut from a beautiful beef tenderloin. Whether you seek a classic filet prep, or something with additional flair, I’ve got you covered with prep tips, too! Just pop open the wine, play some music, and enjoy some time well spent cooking together.

For the “Surf”

Our Stuffed Lobster Tail comes oven ready to bake from our Seafood department, featuring cold water lobster tails stuffed with real crab, plenty of butter, a touch of Old Bay Seasoning tossed with Panko Bread Crumbs, and a squeeze of lemon juice. These come stuffed, but you will need to cook them when you are ready for your meal. Instructions: Pre-heat the oven to 425°F. Place stuffed tails on a lined pan. Drizzle with melted butter and cook for 18-22 minutes or until lobster meat is cooked through and opaque. Serve with a fresh squeeze of lemon.

For the “Turf”

The Filet Mignon cut is from DLM Natural Beef Tenderloin, and is lifetime free of antibiotics and hormones. Let me tell you, when you start with a great quality steak like this, you’re in for a treat. Don’t be intimidated by this cut of beef! Whether you pan sear, grill, or roast it, this cut is mild and tender. It doesn’t need any complicated ingredients to make it shine—just some good sea salt and a grind or two of black pepper. Either separately or together, DLM Beef Tenderloin and our Stuffed Lobster Tail make an elegant dinner that you can prepare at home. Whether you want to share is up to you!

3 Ways to Prepare Filet Mignon

Traditional Pan-Seared Filet Prep Tips

Filet with Blue Cheese Crust Recipe

Filet Mignon with Madeira & Mushrooms

Zest for Cooking

Cooking with citrus is like cooking with sunshine—it just makes me happy and adds a fresh burst of flavor. A common question that I often get at the DLM Culinary Center is when to use citrus zest vs. juice. When juice (especially lemon) is used, it adds flavor and sourness (aka acid), plus the liquid volume. Meanwhile, zest will bolster up the citrus flavor without increasing the liquid volume. Plus, it has a pure citrus flavor from the oil stored in the outside pores of the fruit. I use zest liberally in a lot of my cooking to help add a punch of flavor.

zest for cooking

HOW TO ZEST

• The best tool out there for zesting and one gadget I think everyone needs in their kitchen is the award-winning Microplane Zester, available at the DLM Culinary Center. It zests beautifully every single time. As a bonus, it does wonders for hard cheeses as well, like Parmigiano-Reggiano. We also love the Zyliss Zester, available in stores.
• Before zesting, make sure to wash and dry the fruit first. It is simply not fun to try and zest already cut fruit. Always cut and juice after you zest.
• Avoid the white pith of citrus fruits—that’s the stuff separating the colorful zest from the actual fruit. It’s too bitter and shouldn’t be used.

IDEAS FOR HOW TO USE ZEST

• Try adding to a simple vinaigrette to brighten things up.
• Add a new dimension by zesting a little bit of lemon, lime, or orange zest into your favorite muffin, sweet bread, scone, or biscuit recipe.
• Make anything fried taste “lighter” and brighter by adding right into the batter before frying, from donuts to fish.
• Put it in pasta to add a zip at the end that’ll help make flavors pop.
• Make a better pan sauce by enriching the pan drippings with a hit of both juice and some zest.
• The final step to any dish is the last taste to adjust the seasoning. Besides salt, citrus zest or juice helps brings out the flavors of other ingredients. It will make your dishes shine with flavor!

CLICK HERE TO GET OUR FAVORITE CITRUS RECIPES!

Holiday Cozy Comforts: Charcuterie at Home

After all the shopping, planning, cooking, wrapping, and decorating, it’s finally time to close the door and dig into cozy time spent with your loved ones to enjoy it all. This is why I like to balance out my more elaborate meals with some no-stress, no-cooking ideas to have on tap for the holidays. Not quite ready for dinner or don’t feel like making another fussy meal? Open up a good bottle of wine and set out a charcuterie board with some holiday touches. Happy holidays to you (and me)!

 

4 STEPS TO BUILD A CHARCUTERIE BOARD

STEP 1: Start by placing small bowls or ramekins on your board or platter. These are for things like nuts, olives, mustards, dips, etc. We like to use Marcona Almonds, Edmond Fallot Mustard, and L’Épicurien Jams.

STEP 2: Place your cheeses and crackers or flatbreads that pair together near them. When choosing your cheeses, think about varying the textures and flavors from buttery to nutty, creamy to hard. DLM Cheesemonger Maritza Cuellar-Crowdy has a fun way to set the framework for her board. “… I think of a rhyme I once learned. Something old, something new, something goat, and something blue.” Some of our go-to selections include Parmigiano-Reggiano that’s complex in flavor and studded with crunchy crystals, bold, sharp Barber’s 1833 Vintage Cheddar, velvety and creamy Saint Angel Brie, Le Papillon Roquefort, which has a big personality and wonderful flavor, and bright, tangy Laura Chenel Fresh Chévre.

STEP 3: Add cured meats. We recommend using a variety of Alexian Pâté, Columbus-based North Country Charcuterie, Niman Ranch Charctuerie, Trois Petits Cochons Saucisson Sec Sausage, Fra’ Mani Soppressata, and Prosciutto di Parma.

STEP 4: Place dried or fresh fruits (like grapes, berries, and pomegranate), pickled veggies, and a few sprigs of fresh rosemary. Fill any gaps and arrange to your liking so that a variety of colors and textures show through. It makes eating all the more fun!

 

Look for gourmet gifts that ship, like our Charcuterie and Cheese Board.

Holiday Cozy Comforts: Sweet Nostalgia Dessert Board

This winter, revel in all the cozy comforts of home and pull out special holiday goodies from your stash! You’ll never regret stocking up on old-fashioned candy canes like the handmade varieties from Hammond’s, imported European cookies, candies, Yoder’s Peanut Brittle, and an assortment of chocolate covered pretzels and popcorn from our Holiday Display.

For me, nothing is as cozy or melts the icy chill of the winter air after a brisk walk or round of snow shoveling like a steaming mug of our DLM Handmade Hot Cocoa Mix, made by us with rich cocoa powder and disks of French chocolate that melt right in. You also can’t go wrong grabbing some festive Thumbprint Cookies or Servatti Pastry Shop Stollen in our Bakery.

Last but not least, make sure you grab a pint of your favorite Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams holiday flavors, like White Chocolate Peppermint or Sugar Plum. Now where are my slippers?

TIP: Make any night feel special by creating a special sweet nostalgia dessert board, overflowing with delights.

Thanksgiving Turkey Prep: 3 Methods to Try

I love all the November food magazines, blogs, and chefs all claiming they have finally found the best way to cook a turkey. Truth is, there is no one and only best way to cook it. Deciding on the desired end results will help the home cook figure out which particular cooking method can get them there.

Lots of families want the whole roasted bird as the centerpiece of their holiday table. While others want crispy, crackly skin with juicy tender meat inside, sans the stress of carving at the table. Some of us want a simple method that yields easy clean up, with just enough breast meat leftover for sandwiches. Others are in it for the adventure! Whatever you’re looking for, here are three ideas for how to prepare your locally raised Non-GMO DLM Free-Range Turkey, the turkey that’s the talk of the town!

1. The Traditional Whole Roasted Turkey

Step 1: Remove the neck and gizzards and discard or place in the bottom of the roasting pan if you desire. Rinse the turkey, drain well, and pat dry.

Step 2: Rub skin with Vera Jane’s Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and season well with Kosher salt and DLM Grilling & Seasoning Rub.

Step 3: Fill the cavity with celery, onion, and a quartered lemon. Add an inch of water to the pan and roast covered (uncover at end to lightly brown).

Step 4: Pull when meat thermometer reads 165ºF in the thigh. Let turkey rest for 15-20 minutes before carving. It’s that simple! Hint: If turkey is too large to fit in your pan, see No. 3 below for a Spatchcocked Turkey.

Approximate Roasting Times*
12–17 lbs = 3¼ to 4½ hours
18–21 lbs = 4¼ to 5¼ hours
22–24 lbs = 5¼ to 6¼ hours

*Times above are for a 350°F oven with an unstuffed turkey (no stuffing in the cavity). To ensure that turkey is fully cooked to 165°F, insert the thermometer into the thickest part of the inner thigh.

LEARN MORE >>> 5 Common Turkey Prep Questions Answered

2. Turkey Breast

We all know that dark meat is the most flavorful, but for those white meat fans, roasting a turkey breast is just the ticket.

Step 1: Try rubbing it with an herb butter, either making your own or using our DLM Herb Butter from The DLM Cheese Shop. Rub all over the outside and even tuck some under the skin!

Step 2: Choose a pan that’s slightly larger than your breast. Add about an inch of liquid to it. Try DLM Premium Turkey Broth or channel your inner Ina Garten and use white wine.

Step 3: Cook low and slow to keep meat from drying out. Preheat oven to 325ºF and cook until it reaches 165ºF.

3. Spatchcocked

The benefits are plenty—cut down on cooking time and maximize that crispy skin!

Step 1: Remove turkey’s backbone using a good pair of kitchen shears. Flatten turkey in pan, breast-side up, pushing down on breast bones. Pull thighs outward.

Step 2: Rub with Vera Jane’s Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper on both sides! Or, use a dry brine for extra crispy skin. Sit turkey uncovered overnight in the fridge.

Step 3: Cook to 165ºF. To carve, remove legs and wings and slice breast meat, paying attention to cut away from breastbone.